Space Management

Who We Are

The Space Management team provides effective stewardship of the OSU space allocation database, manages space requests, facilitates the Annual OSU Space Survey, supports campus moves coordination and provides accurate and timely space allocation and utilization data reports to inform long-term space needs decision-making.

What We Do

Planning

  • Integrate space management planning with university planning objectives
  • Plan for current and future space management and planning needs of Oregon State
  • Identify strategies for space management efficiency to meet OSU goals and objectives
  • Manage OSU Space Use Guidelines and Annual Space Reports and assist in the application of this information

Services and Processes

  • Managing OSU's Space Allocation database and AutoCAD drawings
  • Validating space data through conducting site audits to verify and validate space allocation and usage and through facilitating the annual OSU Space Survey
  • Overseeing space requests and assisting in campus moves coordination
  • Maintaining OSU Space Use Standards and Policies and Annual Space Reports
  • Providing timely space usage information to inform university-wide decision-making

How We Operate

About Us

OSU Space Management has the designated responsibility for maintaining the university’s space inventory. 

Our Mission:

To promote efficient use and allocation of space by supplying accurate and timely information and analysis that informs capital and space planning decisions and optimizes the Federal Finance and Administration Cost Recovery for OSU. 

The Space Management Unit within Capital Planning and Development manages the space use of the 8,000,000+ square feet of OSU space around the state of Oregon, which equates to billions of dollars in facility assets.  When we can better identify underutilized space, and optimize efficient use of existing space, OSU can realize reduced occupancy costs, as well as meet sustainability and stewardship objectives. 

Targeting improvements to better identify underutilized space and optimizing efficient use of existing space, CPD’s Office of Space Management continually strives to better respond to the increased scope of responsibility and demand for effective stewardship and accountability in managing the 8,000,000+ square feet of OSU space around the state of Oregon, which equates to billions of dollars in facility assets. 

Significant data query and reporting upgrades were made to the space management database, resulting in streamlined reporting operations and providing a deeper understanding of real-time space information across campus.  New systems have saved hundreds of hours of collating information that historically have been needed to aggregate information about facilities across OSU.

A complete shift of space usage codes was made to align OSU with the Postsecondary Education Facilities Inventory and Classification Manual (FICM) standard, which is the standard in classifying and reporting space in higher education settings.  

With the target of completing field verification of all OSU space throughout the state by 2017, Space Management continues to make great strides in an intensive effort to map and inventory all OSU space.

 

Who We Are

The Space Management team provides effective stewardship of the OSU space allocation database, manages space requests, facilitates the Annual OSU Space Survey, supports campus moves coordination and provides accurate and timely space allocation and utilization data reports to inform long-term space needs decision-making.

 

What We Do

Planning

  • Integrate space management planning with university planning objectives
  • Plan for current and future space management and planning needs of Oregon State
  • Identify strategies for space management efficiency to meet OSU goals and objectives
  • Manage OSU Space Use Guidelines and Annual Space Reports and assist in the application of this information

Services and Processes

  • Managing OSU's Space Allocation database and AutoCAD drawings
  • Validating space data through conducting site audits to verify and validate space allocation and usage and through facilitating the annual OSU Space Survey
  • Overseeing space requests and assisting in campus moves coordination
  • Maintaining OSU Space Use Standards and Policies and Annual Space Reports
  • Providing timely space usage information to inform university-wide decision-making

 

How We Operate

Oregon State University is required to maintain an accurate inventory of all buildings it owns or leases.  OSU Space Management has the designated responsibility for maintaining the university’s space inventory. We continue working to better respond to the increased scope of responsibility and demand for effective stewardship and accountability in managing the 8,000,000+ square feet of OSU space around the state of Oregon, which equates to billions of dollars in facility assets.  The Space Inventory provides the statistical basis for many internal, local, state, and federal reports regarding campus buildings, their usage, capacity and occupants.  The proper classification of space is vital to the university’s efforts in obtaining resources from State and Federal agencies (e.g., Facilities and Administrative rates and building renewal dollars). 

Managing Space Data

Oregon State University is required to maintain an accurate inventory of all buildings it owns or leases.  OSU Space Management has the designated responsibility for maintaining the university’s space inventory. We continue working to better respond to the increased scope of responsibility and demand for effective stewardship and accountability in managing the 8,000,000+ square feet of OSU space around the state of Oregon, which equates to billions of dollars in facility assets.  The Space Inventory provides the statistical basis for many internal, local, state, and federal reports regarding campus buildings, their usage, capacity and occupants.  The proper classification of space is vital to the university’s efforts in obtaining resources from State and Federal agencies (e.g., Facilities and Administrative rates and building renewal dollars). 

Validating Space Data

All space at Oregon State University (OSU) is owned or leased by the university and is a shared, and finite resource. Managing space efficiently reduces resource expenditures for operations and maintenance and reduces the need for capital construction. Allocating space judiciously ensures that existing space is managed efficiently and new and renovated construction is planned realistically and conservatively. 

As organizations, departments, colleges and programs change and grow, space remodeling and renovations, staffing changes, and staff/departmental moves creates the need for space data verifications.  Throughout the year, the Space Management Team conducts field verifications to keep the space data as up-to-date as possible.  In fact, during the 2015 Summer Break, the Space Team completed field verifications of nearly the entire Corvallis campus.

Overseeing Space Requests and Coordinating Campus Moves

Space Management supports the Provost in managing space requests.  When requests for space result in competing priorities, we look for creative and effective solutions to make the most effective and efficient use of campus space - with the goal of supporting OSU's goals and objectives.  We also assist in the coordination of campus move planning and surge needs.

Maintaining Space Guidelines and Annual Reports

Each year, the Space Management team reviews and updates the OSU Space Use Standards and Policies document.  This document is intended to aid in the planning, allocation, and management of campus space in establishing equitable, consistent, efficient and flexible planning parameters for making sound management decisions regarding space allocation for both new construction and building renewal and renovation.

Updated at the end of each academic year, the Annual Space Report is intended to clearly and succinctly provide space information in a variety of standard formats for use by OSU users or others interested in OSU spatial data.

Providing Timely, Accurate Data

The Space Management team strives to provide the most accurate and timely space management data information to the campus community.  It is our intent that providing this information will better inform campus-wide decision-making in:

    • lowering occupancy costs;
    • reducing the need for physical expansion of the build environment;
    • creating balanced solutions for collaboration and personal work environments;
    • improving space utilization, functionality and flexibility:
    • advancing utilization metrics and analytical techniques;
    • improving processes for space planning and governance;
    • increasing worker mobility and connectivity; and 
    • raising the quality and accessibility of space occupancy data.

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OSU Space Standards

All space at Oregon State University (OSU) is owned or leased by the university and is a shared and finite resource. Managing space efficiently reduces resource expenditures for operations and maintenance and reduces the need for capital construction. Allocating space judiciously ensures that existing space is managed efficiently, and new and renovated construction is planned realistically and conservatively.

It is the intent of OSU to provide academic and administrative departments with a quality workplace environment that supports program operations, preserves the value of space, promotes environmental sustainability and reduces operation and maintenance costs. OSU work space should support and improve the productivity of its employees/faculty and programs. Standards and practices for space planning will be used to achieve this goal.

I.   INTRODUCTION TO THE OSU SPACE STANDARDS AND POLICIES

  • Space Standards Authority and Administration
  • Roles in Applying the Standards
  • Special Circumstances

II.  OFFICE FACILITIES

Office Facilities Overview

  • Office Space Types
  • Office Accessory Space Types

Office Space

  • Office Space Allocation
  • Touchdown (Hoteling) Space
  • Considerations for Improved Office Space Efficiency
  • Non-OSU-Funded Office Space
  • Special Circumstances
  • Office Space Allocation Table

Office Accessory Space

  • Office Accessory Space Allocation
  • Office Accessory Space Management Types
  • Office Accessory Space Uses
  • Traditional and Open Office Accessory Space Layout
  • Breakout Rooms
  • Community Spaces
  • Office Service Area and Storage
  • Office Accessory Space Allocation Table

III.  APPENDIX

Space Standards Reference Information

  • Background
  • Authority and Adminstration
  • Space Standards Development
  • Scope and Impact of Space Standards
  • Application of Space Standards
  • Roles in Applying the Standards
  • Special Circumstances
  • New Construction and Renovation
  • Existing Spaces
  • Older Buildings and Non-Conforming Space
  • Space Costs

Space Management Principles

APPENDIX

Space Standards Reference Information

  • Background
  • Authority and Administration
  • Space Standards Development
  • Application of Space Standards
  • Roles in Applying Space Standards
  • Special Circumstances
  • New Construction and Renovation
  • Existing Spaces
  • Older Buildings and Non-Conforming Space
  • Space Costs

Space Management Principles

  • OSU Space Inventory
  • FICM Standards
  • Definition of Terms

Introduction to the OSU Space Standards and Policies

All space at Oregon State University (OSU) is owned or leased by the university and is a shared and finite resource. Managing space efficiently reduces resource expenditures for operations and maintenance and reduces the need for capital construction. Allocating space judiciously ensures that existing space is managed efficiently, and new and renovated construction is planned realistically and conservatively.

It is the intent of OSU to provide academic and administrative departments with a quality workplace environment that supports program operations, preserves the value of space, promotes environmental sustainability and reduces operation and maintenance costs. OSU work space should support and improve the productivity of its employees/faculty and programs. Standards and practices for space planning will be used to achieve this goal.

Authority and Administration

To aid in the planning, allocating and managing space on campus, the space planning standards in this document will assist the university community in establishing equitable, consistent, efficient and flexible planning parameters, and help make sound management decisions about space allocations both for new construction and within existing or renovated buildings. Oregon State University (OSU) is using and managing space in a manner consistent with the guiding principles of the Strategic Plan 3.0 of the university. The Space Management unit within Capital Planning and Development (CPD) administers these standards and coordinates their implementation.

Roles in Applying the Standards

The Space Management Team, under the direction of VP Finance and Administration, assists the university community with specific space planning projects and provides customer support on space planning and design related topics. Space Management maintains the inventory of space allocations, types and uses on the campus. The Space Management team is available to work with departments to inventory and assess existing space usage, translate program aspirations into space needs and propose space allocation recommendations, using the standards stated in this document to determine space needs of university departments.

Maintaining an accurate inventory of campus space is a critical part of Finance and Administration. The space inventory database provides important information for maximizing university resource efficiency and financial support. The data are used for determining the rate of Federal Finance and Administration Cost Recovery, internal/external reporting and analysis, master planning, facilities maintenance, logistics, and mail services. In order to maintain an accurate inventory of space, an annual space survey will be conducted. Every department is designated a space coordinator who will work with Space Management to complete the survey, to document any changes in space uses, floor plans, or occupants. It is also important for departments to contact Space Management whenever changes are made within their spaces throughout the year. Space Management works with departments regarding their requests for space, gathering information related to the request, and performing programming and needs assessments.

Special Circumstances

In special circumstances, approved by the Dean and/or Department Chair, faculty or staff office may be larger or smaller than standards. These circumstances might include:

  • Special or unusual building configurations that affect the efficiency of the space
  • Particular accessibility issues
  • Overall school and/or department space constraints or needs

Office Facilities

Office facilities include both offices and office related service areas. An office is defined as a room or suite of rooms equipped with desks, chairs, files, bookcases, computers, etc. that is assigned to one or more persons primarily for the performance of administrative duties other than meeting of classes. An office service area is defined as an area, which directly supports an office (or group of offices) as an extension of the activities in an office.

Office Space

  • Staff Offices: An office used by staff in the performance of their regularly assigned duties, including clerical, stenographic, receptionist and also any management personnel not included as an administrative position.
  • Faculty Offices: A room assigned to a faculty member for the performance of duties other than the meeting of classes.
  • Administrative Offices: A room or suite of rooms used by administrative personnel for the performance of administrative duties, including rooms generally referred to as the offices of presidents, business managers, all deans, associate and assistant deans serving the entire institution (such as deans of administration, faculty and graduate school), registrars, directors of admissions, dean of students, placement directors and director of student counseling.
  • Student Offices: An office or portion of an office used by employed students for the performance of duties other than the meeting of classes, including Graduate Research Assistant (GRA), Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA), Work Study Students and Practicum.

Office Accessory Space

  • Office Service Spaces: A space that directly serves an office or group of offices as an extension of the activities in those spaces, such as file rooms, break rooms, kitchenettes serving office areas, copy and fax rooms, vaults, closets, private rest rooms not available to the public, records rooms, office supply rooms, first aid rooms serving office areas, student counseling rooms and testing (assessment, non-health, non-discipline-related) rooms, and open and private (restricted/nonpublic) circulation areas.
  • Conference Rooms: A space serving an office complex and used primarily for staff meetings and departmental activities.
  • Conference Room Service Spaces: A space that directly serves one or more conference spaces as an extension of the activities in those spaces.

Office Accessory Space

Office Accessory Space Allocation

There are a number of spaces associated with office space in planning and/or renovating buildings. Some of these include conference rooms, breakout spaces, kitchen space, break rooms, office service areas, and storage space. These areas are important spaces for everyday office functions and as part of OSU’s commitment to creating a workplace environment that promotes health and wellbeing, and are particularly valuable in open office environments. These areas can present challenges in the establishment of standards due to the varying degree of needs for these types of spaces. See OSU Construction Standards for Special Use Room Types information.

Office Accessory Space Management Types

To ensure efficiency and high utilization, office accessories should be shared by departments whenever possible. For the purpose of these standards there are three types of management associated with office accessories:

General University: Managed by a department(s) but available to all university staff and faculty. Conference rooms are available on a first come first serve priority. This management type would include all large conference rooms (seating 15 or more) and is encouraged for all other conference rooms, as well as other office accessory spaces.

Departmental Share: Managed by a department(s) and available at most times to the university staff and faculty. University Community would request space through the department. This management type would include all medium and small conference rooms (seating 8-14) that are not ‘General University’ rooms.

Departmental: Managed by department and generally not available to the rest of the university community. Typical functions that would require departmental conference rooms are:

  • Academic Departments who use rooms for seminar instruction (seating less than 12). (Departments are encouraged to share these rooms with other departments within their school/college)
  • Research groups whose conference rooms are also used as workrooms
  • Academic and administrative departments have varying functional needs throughout campus. While some departments may need minimal or no office accessory spaces, other departments may require additional and/or specialty spaces to meet their functional needs. The Space Management team will work with departments to determine individual department’s office accessory space needs.

Building Share: Managed by department and generally not available to the rest of the university community.

Office Accessory Uses

The following standards, policies, and procedures describe the typology, size and furniture layouts for most common types of office accessory uses at OSU. Not every department on campus will need all of the following spaces, these standards will apply to those departments whose functions deem these accessory spaces appropriate for their functions.

Conference Rooms: Conference rooms are an important asset to OSU and daily office functions. Conference rooms vary in sizes across campus and provide space for quick impromptu meetings, administrative meetings, and space for academic departments to hold seminar classes.

Departments have varying needs for conference rooms. It is important to meet those needs, while also ensuring that conference rooms are well utilized. Conference rooms can present utilization challenges, as they can occupy a large footprint in a department’s allocated office space and can be unused many hours per week. It is important for departments to track the utilization of their ‘Departmental’ conference rooms, if they have any, and open conference rooms up to the university community when rooms are underutilized.

Construction of new conference rooms should be strategically planned near department entrances or along shared corridors to allow for ease of use by the university community. Conference rooms should be shared with the general university whenever possible. For the purpose of these standards there are three types of conference rooms:

  • Large Conference Room: seats 15 or more occupants and provides space for audio/visual equipment, a screen and/or white board for projection and display, and may also include bookcases or shelves, and a serving area for buffet food or coffee services.
  • Medium Conference Room: seats 8 to 14 occupants and provides space for audio/visual equipment, and a screen and/or white board for projection.
  • Small Conference Room: seats 4 to 7 occupants and may provide space for audio/visual equipment, and a screen and/or white board for projection.

The number and size of conference rooms will heavily depend on the office typology and the demonstrated need of the department. The area required for conference rooms depends on the room configuration, furniture type and layout. The amount of space required per person generally decreases as the room area increases, due to the ratio of space required for circulation and ADA accessibility. The net assignable square feet (NASF) per person is generally 25 for small conference rooms, 22.5 for medium and 22 for large. Area must also be added to accommodate the floor area footprint of audio/visual equipment, displays, bookcases or shelves, serving counters for buffet food or coffee services and other operational facilities as necessary. The total number of conference rooms required to serve a grouping of office areas varies widely depending on the functions of the departments and the number of employees in an open office environment. The following standards serve as a framework for determining the number of conference rooms in each area. To ensure the best fit departments should contact CPD for a study on conference room needs.

Traditional and Open Office Accessory Layout

Traditional Office Layout (majority of private offices, minority of cubicles):

  • 1 conference room per 30 FTE
    • 2/3 of conference rooms should be medium (8-14 people)
      • Ownership: Departmental share or departmental
  • 1/3 of conference rooms should be small (4-7 people)
    • Ownership: Departmental

Open Office Layout (majority of cubicles, minority of private offices):

  • 1 conference room per 10 FTE
    • 1/3 of conference rooms should be medium (8-14 people)
      • Ownership: Departmental share or departmental
  • 2/3 of conference rooms should be small (4-7 people)

In general, large conference rooms (seating 15+) will be constructed for larger departments or where a need within a building can be demonstrated. The number and size of the conference rooms will be determined by CPD, based on a functional need assessment of the building. Large conference rooms may be allocated to a department (to be determined by the Space Management) but will be available to be scheduled by any department on campus. These rooms should include audio/visual equipment, a screen and/or white board for projection and display, bookcases or shelves, and a serving area for buffet food or coffee services whenever possible.

Breakout Rooms

Breakout rooms, often considered ‘work rooms’, are an integral part of the open office layout. Breakout rooms provide staff and faculty a quiet area for private conversations (in person or on the phone) or a quiet area to focus on work. These rooms are often unscheduled and available for employees at any time. As established above, an open office layout allows for additional small conference rooms. Ones that are departmentally controlled are encouraged to be used as breakout rooms for staff and faculty when meetings are not scheduled. Additional smaller breakout rooms may be created if departments have frequent meetings and/or need additional quiet workspaces, which can be especially important in open space environments. These rooms should be equipped with data jacks for phone and network connections.

Community Spaces

Community spaces include kitchens and break rooms and are an important asset to an office and the health and wellbeing of staff and faculty. Community spaces increase productivity and morale by providing staff and faculty a place to relax, store and prepare food, and build positive relationships.

While community spaces are an important asset to an office, the construction of small kitchenettes or break rooms in every department is an inefficient use of space and resources and many departments don’t have the resources or space to provide them.

OSU encourages general university and departmentally shared community spaces whenever feasible. Centralizing community spaces provides equity across departments, ensuring that all employees have access to kitchens and break rooms. It also provides a cost savings in terms of appliance purchases and use, and is more sustainable in terms of energy use. In addition, centralized community spaces provide opportunities for collaboration and relationships with other departments.

Departmentally controlled kitchens and break rooms are discouraged at OSU. When departmentally controlled community spaces are requested, departments need to provide compelling reasons that address the Space Management guiding principles and the university’s mission.

The size of and number of community spaces created for new construction will depend on the functions and size of the building. CPD will work closely with Capital Projects and Construction to determine the number, size and locations of community spaces.

Office Service Area and Storage

Office services areas and storage include printers, copiers, files and shared office supplies. A separate office service area for each work group or small department is discouraged whenever feasible. Creating centralized office service areas improve space utilization as well as cost efficiencies (equipment costs can be shared) and are more sustainable (reducing energy and costs resulting from operating duplicative equipment and procurements and costs resulting from small orders of the same supplies rather than one larger order.

In circumstances where a centralized office service area is not feasible, larger departments and/or departments that require privacy and confidentiality, a departmentally controlled office service area may still be considered. In these cases, departments should work with the CPD to determine the amount of space needed for office service functions.

Storage areas for files should also be minimized as much as possible to save space and fulfill the Oregon Administrative Rules (OAR) retention policies regarding the discard/destruction of unnecessary documents, manuals and duplicated and outdated materials. File rooms shall be limited to only items that cannot be digitally archived when feasible. Departments should adhere to their records retention policies to ensure efficient space utilization.

As a standard, departmentally controlled open office service and securable storage rooms are not to exceed 10% of the office space allocated to the department. For example, if a department is allocated 1,000 NASF, office services and storage areas will not exceed 100 NASF (Net Assignable Square Feet).

 

Office Accessory Space Allocation Table

Office Accessory Allocation NASF per Occupant Total NASF Total # People
Large conference room General University 22 330+ 15+
Med. Conference Room General University or Departmental Share 22.5 180-315 8-14
Small Conference Room General University, Departmental Share or Departmental 25 100-175 4-7
Breakout Rooms Departmental Share or Departmental 25 100 4 max
Community Space General University, Departmental Share or Departmental 20 Based on building need Based on building need
Office Service area and Storage Departmental Share or Departmental N/A Not to exceed 10% of department total office NASF N/A

Office Space

Office Space Allocation

The decision about whether to allocate an office or a cubicle should be made on the basis of the type of work an individual performs and their time appointment (full-time vs. part-time, seasonal vs. year round).  The following provides descriptions and articulate the sizes and utilization standards for various types of offices at Oregon State University.

  • Large Private Office:  these offices are for staff and faculty with functions that require high levels of privacy (need for frequent confidential meetings and/or phone conversations and working with high volumes of confidential materials) and enough space to frequently meet with 4 or more individuals. Typical assignments may include: president, provost, vice president/provost, deans, department chair, and executive directors.
  • Regular Private Office:  these offices are for 1.0 FTE staff/faculty that require high levels of privacy. Typical assignment may include: faculty, academic professionals, directors and managers.
  • Regular Open Office:  open offices are encouraged by Oregon State University and are to be used by all 1.0 FTE staff and faculty whose functions do not require additional space and who can use breakout and conference rooms for discussions that require high levels of privacy.
  • Regular Shared Office:  these office spaces are for below .5 FTE staff/faculty with functions that require meeting with up to two other and/or requiring some confidentiality, security, visual and acoustical privacy.
  • Regular Shared Open Office:  these office spaces are for below .5 FTE staff/faculty whose functions do not require additional space for meeting and/or require confidentiality, security, visual and acoustical privacy.

Touchdown (Hoteling) Space

As space inventory becomes increasing limited, touchdown, or hoteling, just-in-time office space is becoming more and more utilized.  Whether addressing staff needs for distant campuses or experimental stations or relocating administrative and other staff off campus to free space to accommodate growing academic programs, the use of touchdown space provides a convenient means for staff to accomplish work as they move from the main campus to other campus locations. As a “just-in-time” office space that is shared by many, touchdown spaces should be should be flexible to meet a variety of workspace needs, but also conveniently located with easy access to printers, copiers, etc.

Considerations for Improved Office Space Efficiency

  • A modular planning approach, such as co-location offices of similar sizes and types provides increased flexibility of office use over time and assists in preparing for future needs and changes in academic and other programs.
  • Positioning offices in the building core rather than along the windowed side of buildings increases flexibility and improves air quality and light penetration for the building.
  • Eliminating excess paper by sorting, purging and archiving documents not only brings space efficiency, but also helps identify specialized storage needs or furniture solutions.
  • Regular reviews of office space assignments and changing needs to ensure assignments still make sense helps to keep office rosters up-to-date, and helps identify space reallocations that might be necessary.
  • Lockable storage should be provided for faculty, staff and graduate teaching assistants (GTA) in open and shared office space situations.

Non-OSU-Funded Office Space

Emeritus, visiting, and courtesy faculty provide valuable contributions to the teaching, scholarship, service, and outreach missions of OSU. Thus, it is in the University’s and a unit’s interest to provide opportunities for all faculty to contribute toward the unit and its mission. However, because of limitations in available space, not all requests for assignment of office and\or laboratory space can be granted, and those requests that are approved may involve sharing space and equipment. Assignment of space has monetary consequences for a unit and the University. Providing space carries significant costs, both in terms of services associated with access and in terms of potential alternate uses. The following information is provided to aid unit supervisors’ decision making process.

  • Space belongs to the University, not to the occupant, unit, or college, and is to be assigned in the best interests of the university. Unit supervisors have primary responsibility for space management and assignments, as they are expected to have a clearer understanding of the most efficient use of allocated space.
  • The unit supervisor shall periodically review space assignments for courtesy, emeritus, and visiting faculty and staff and, if necessary, reassign space to optimize performance of unit teaching, scholarship, service, and outreach missions. This will include an assessment of expected contributions of the faculty or staff member during the following year or period covered by an MOU or letter of appointment, and an assessment of the costs/benefits to current students, faculty, and the unit as a whole. The unit leader may request written proposals from courtesy, emeritus, and visiting faculty to aid in this review and shall consult a relevant advisory committee, when available.
  • Not all meritorious requests can be guaranteed space. Appeals of decisions are to be directed to the administrator to whom the unit supervisor reports.
  • Successful requests for assignment of dedicated space should demonstrate clear benefits to the unit. Examples of departmental contributions that may warrant assignment of space include:
    • Instruction of at least one regularly scheduled course, as assigned by the unit administrator;
    • Being a principal investigator or substantive co-investigator on a research grant(s) that provides financial support to the department in an amount at least roughly equivalent to NIH Indirect Cost Guidelines;
    • Service on a significant standing departmental committee at the request of the chair. This service should be roughly equivalent in time commitment to teaching a course.
    • Formal advising and mentoring of graduate students.
    • Supervision of undergraduate research.
    • Service to the profession (significant journal or book editorial responsibilities, service on grant peer review committees, service as an officer in a professional society, etc). Such duties enhance the prestige of OSU and should be considered a contribution to the mission of the unit and/or university.
    • Faculty must make arrangements for the continuing management of their research and teaching collections, as well as equipment, at the time of their retirement. These arrangements should transfer management of the collections to the unit, college or university, as appropriate, and should be made in consultation with the Research Office.

Special Circumstances

When special circumstance meet the guiding principles of efficient space use and the mission of the university and are approved by the Director of Space Management, they may qualify for a variance.

  • Multiple (Second) Offices:  Assignment of multiple offices for faculty and staff is highly discouraged at OSU. However, when an individual has two different functions not performed in close proximity, the individual may need two separate offices.  Faculty with joint appointments and persons with staff in multiple buildings may be assigned a secondary work station in a shared or open office if there is a true demonstrated need.
  • Unoccupied/Underutilized Offices:  When offices are left unoccupied for a significant period of time or are underutilized, departments should utilize these spaces to alleviate any pressing space needs. If offices remain unoccupied for over six months, the space will be turned back over to the university for reallocation.
  • Emeritus Office:  emeritus faculty with significant continuing research and/or teaching responsibilities may be provided shared office space (private or open), if available, as long as they remain engaged in department activities.
  • Visiting Scholars:  visiting scholars may be provided shared office space (private or open) if available.

Office Space Allocation Table

Office Type Space Type NASF per FTE Typical Assignment Functional Notes
Large Office Private Office 150—300
Goal of 200
President, provost, Vice president, vice provost, dean, department chair, executive directors 1.0 FTE staff/faculty that require frequent meetings with four or more others and/or require confidentiality, security, visual and acoustical privacy
Regular Office Private Office 90-120
Goal of 100
Faculty, academic professionals, directors, managers 1.0 FTE staff/faculty that require frequent meetings with up to two others and/or requiring confidentiality, security, visual and acoustical privacy
Regular Open Office Private Open Office 42-72 Professional staff, support staff, faculty, academic professionals Encouraged for all 1.0 FTE staff/faculty whose function does not require additional space for meeting and whose need for confidentiality, security, visual and acoustical privacy can be accommodated in a breakout room
Regular Shared Office Shared Private Office 90-120
45-60 sf/person
Faculty and academic professionals Below .5 FTE staff/faculty with functions that require meeting with up to two other and/or requiring some confidentiality, security, visual and acoustical privacy
Regular Shared Open Office Shared Open Office 42-72
21-36 sf/person
Support staff, student employees, graduate assistants and interns Below .5 FTE staff/faculty whose functions do not require additional space for meeting and/or require confidentiality, security, visual and acoustical privacy

Space Management Principles

Space Management Principles Overview

In conjunction with the OSU’s mission, the following principles help guide its work in developing university space standards.

  • The Oregon State University Board of Trustees has ownership and control of all facilities belonging to or controlled by the university. Ultimate responsibility for the assignment of reassignment of space resides with the President, upon recommendation of the Provost and Vice President for Finance and Administration.
  • Allocation of space does not imply permanence, but rather a commitment based upon continued program justification and to changing program priorities. Allocation of increased square footage depends upon a demonstrated campus-wide need. 
  • Space vacated by a physical move, renovation, or new construction is allocated back to the common university reserve.  Likewise, space vacated due to a reduction in program size, reduction in workforce, or program elimination is also allocated back to the common university reserve.
  • All university space, particularly classrooms and class labs, will be managed to ensure effective and efficient utilization. The university will conduct annual classroom and class lab utilization studies to ensure optimum utilization of the spaces.
  • All space data, analysis and reports are in the public domain and available for inspection.
  • The preservation of department or operating unit integrity is a high priority.  The university will make a concerted effort to locate members of the same department, office, or unit close to each other whenever possible and will only split units on an interim or as necessary basis.
  • OSU Construction Standards are to be used by all architects, engineers (A/E), and other design and construction professionals under contract to do work at and for OSU.  The standards are also a resource for staff and faculty in determining appropriate use of allocated space.  Specifically, space use must comply with Section 01 10 02:  Accessibility Best Practices for OSU in support of OSU’s commitment to universal accessibility.

OSU Space Inventory and Survey

Each year, the Space Management Team works with colleges, departments, programs and units across campus to facilitate the OSU Space Survey.  The survey is conducted between February and June, allowing time in the summer for completing any necessary field verifications.

The purpose of the survey is to ensure OSU’s space inventory is accurately represented and managed. Accurate and timely space allocation and usage data supports effective facilities planning and budgeting activities, including indirect cost recoveries, space allocation, and capital planning. 

Working collaboratively with the designated Space Contacts across campus, the Space Management team verifies the following data and updates the OSU Space Management Database accordingly.  Data verified in the Survey includes the following.

  • Square footage of each room/space on campus
  • The Organization (college, department, program, unit) to which a space is assigned
  • Assignment of the appropriate Facility (room) Type Code for each space
  • Assignment of the correct Functional Space Use Code for each space

FICM Standards

In 2015, OSU Space Management updated and revised space codes to align with FICM standards.  The Postsecondary Education Facilities Inventory and Classification Manual (FICM) describes standard practices for initiating, conducting, reporting, and maintaining a postsecondary institutional facilities inventory. 

Facility Type Codes

Facility Type (room type) Codes identify the primary use of the room and how it is used. In addition to unclassified spaces, such as circulation areas, restrooms, or building service areas, these codes include:

  • Classrooms - (Category 100):  General purpose classrooms, lecture halls, recitation rooms, seminar rooms, and other spaces used primarily for scheduled non-laboratory instruction, including classroom service areas.
  • Laboratory Facilities (Category 200):  Rooms or spaces characterized by special purpose equipment or a specific configuration that ties instructional or research activities to a particular discipline or a closely related group of disciplines. This includes classroom, open and research/non-class laboratory facilities (dry, computer, wet, and individual study labs, environmental control rooms, student practice rooms and lab service spaces)
  • Office Facilities (Category 300):  Offices and conference rooms specifically assigned to each of the various academic, administrative and service functions. This includes staff, faculty, administrative, student offices, office service spaces, conference rooms and conference services areas
  • Study Facilities (Category 400):  Study rooms and study service spaces, stacks, open-stack reading rooms and library processing spaces.
  • Special use Facilities (Category 500):  Military training rooms, athletic and physical education spaces and locker rooms, media production rooms, clinics, demonstration areas, field buildings, animal quarters, greenhouses, and other room categories that are sufficiently specialized in their primary activity or function to merit a unique room code.
  • General Use Facilities (Category 600):  Assembly rooms, exhibition space, food facilities, lounges, merchandising facilities, recreational facilities, meeting rooms, child and adult care rooms, and other facilities that are characterized by a broader availability to faculty, students, staff, or the public than are special use areas.
  • Support Facilities (Category 700) Computing facilities, shops, central storage areas, vehicle storage areas, and central service space that provide centralized support for the activities of a campus.
  • Health Care Facilities (Category 800 Series) Facilities used to provide patient care (human and animal)
  • Residential Facilities (Category 900 Series) Housing facilities for students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus.
  • Unclassified Facilities (Category 000) Inactive or unfinished areas, or areas in the process of conversion

Functional Space Use Codes

Functional Use Code represents the function or activity that occurs in this space.  Functional Use Codes are vital in determining indirect cost recovery of Facilities and Administrative (F&A) costs associated with sponsored agreements. Accurately tracking and maintaining costs associated with building and equipment depreciation and building O&M Costs is a mandatory requirement by the Office of Management and Budget.

  • Instruction
  • Organized/sponsored research
  • Other sponsored activities
  • Libraries
  • Departmental administration
  • Student Services
  • General Administration
  • Operations and maintenance of plant
  • Other institutional activities
  • Service centers
  • Unoccupied space

 

DEFINITION OF TERMS

CPD:  The Space Management unit is housed within the Department of Capital Planning and Development (CPD)

Gross Square Feet – gsf (also called bgsf-building gross square feet) - GSF is the total area of all floors of a building. This includes the area within the outside faces of exterior walls and floor penetration areas, however insignificant. GSF also includes all building structural, mechanical and other infrastructure systems, all building circulation space, and all support space such as public toilets, lobbies, etc. An interesting issue for Stanford is that this can include building arcades, which represent a significant area of space on the campus, particularly in areas such as the main quad. Gross area also includes space located above and below grade (basements.)

Net Assignable Square Feet – nasf (also called nsf or asf -net square feet or assignable square feet) NASF refers to the space inside a room, as measured from interior wall to interior wall, including “nooks and crannies” which may exist in older buildings. It does not include building circulation, or areas such as restrooms, elevators and stairs. This is the space that is available for assignment to an occupant or for a specific use. The space guidelines are presented in terms of “nasf.”

 

Space Standards Reference Information

Overview

All space at Oregon State University (OSU) is owned or leased by the university and is a shared and finite resource. Managing space efficiently reduces resource expenditures for operations and maintenance and reduces the need for capital construction. Allocating space judiciously ensures that existing space is managed efficiently, and new and renovated construction is planned realistically and conservatively. It is the intent of OSU to provide academic and administrative departments with a quality workplace environment that supports program operations, preserves the value of space, promotes environmental sustainability and reduces operation and maintenance costs. OSU work space should support and improve the productivity of its employees/faculty and programs. Standards and practices for space planning will be used to achieve this goal.

In 2015, OSU Space Management updated and revised space codes to align with the Postsecondary Education Facilities Inventory and Classification Manual (FICM) standards.  This switch greatly clarified the categorization of space types and usages, while also facilitating improved analysis, reporting and management of OSU’s space inventory and allowing more accurate comparison of peer institution space allocation.

Authority and Administration

To aid in the planning, allocating and managing space on campus, the space planning standards in this document will assist the university community in establishing equitable, consistent, efficient and flexible planning parameters, and help make sound management decisions about space allocations both for new construction and within existing or renovated buildings. Oregon State University (OSU) is using and managing space in a manner consistent with the guiding principles of the Strategic Plan 3.0 of the university. The Space Management unit within Capital Planning and Development (CPD) administers these standards and coordinates their implementation.

Space Standards Development

Research was conducted to identify standards at similar peer institutions and practices that support innovation in pedagogy and commitments to sustainability and fiscal responsibility. The space standards in this document reflect existing OSU space use and tradition, along with approaches gathered from other institutions of higher education across the nation.

These Space standards have been informed through insight and feedback from the OSU community, including college, department, program and university leadership, including the recommendations brought through the OSU Space Planning Task Force (2006).

Building upon these recommendations, these standards seek to accommodate a diversity of needs and functions, while recognizing the condition of space and the goals of Oregon State University’s Strategic Plan 3.0. 

Effort has been made to develop standards that:

  • Are consistent with the philosophy that all space belongs to the University,
  • Enable long-term growth of OSU educational, research, and outreach programs,
  • Maintain state-of-the-art facilities through regular upgrade investments and a consistent program of operations and maintenance, and
  • Are responsive to changing programmatic needs.

Scope and Impact of Space Standards

OSU owns or occupies over 8 million gross square feet (GSF) of space throughout the State of Oregon. These standards are intended to provide guidance for the following types of campus space:

  • Classrooms
  • Research laboratory spaces
  • Offices
  • Office Accessory Spaces

These standards do not imply entitlement, although they can restrict resource expenditure. The standards will be reviewed and updated annually and may be refined to meet the changing needs of Oregon State.

The standards in this document will assist the university community in meeting the goals of Oregon State’s mission:

  • As a land, sea, space, sun grant institution committed to teaching, research and outreach and engagement, Oregon State University promotes economic, social, cultural and environmental progress for the people of Oregon, the nation and the world. This mission is achieved by producing graduates competitive in the global economy, supporting a continuous search for new knowledge and solutions and maintaining a rigorous focus on academic excellence, particularly in the three Signature Areas:
    • Advancing the Science of Sustainable Earth Ecosystems
    • Improving Human Health and Wellness
    • Promoting Economic Growth and Social Progress

Application of Space Standards

The space standards are intended to assist the university community in fairly and effectively planning for space needs. The standards are to be applied for any new construction or major renovations at any OSU building and will be used by Capital Planning and Development when planning and designing space on campus. The space standards will also provide the Space Management Team a measure by which to review space allocation proposals.

Roles in Applying the Standards

The Space Management Team, under the direction of VP Finance and Administration, assists the university community with specific space planning projects and provides customer support on space planning and design related topics. Space Management maintains the inventory of space allocations, types and uses on the campus. The Space Management team is available to work with departments to inventory and assess existing space usage, translate program aspirations into space needs and propose space allocation recommendations, using the standards stated in this document to determine space needs of university departments.

Maintaining an accurate inventory of campus space is a critical part of Finance and Administration. The space inventory database provides important information for maximizing university resource efficiency and financial support. The data are used for determining the rate of Federal Finance and Administration Cost Recovery, internal/external reporting and analysis, master planning, facilities maintenance, logistics, and mail services. In order to maintain an accurate inventory of space, an annual space survey will be conducted. Every department is designated a space coordinator who will work with Space Management to complete the survey, to document any changes in space uses, floor plans, or occupants. It is also important for departments to contact Space Management whenever changes are made within their spaces throughout the year. Space Management works with departments regarding their requests for space, gathering information related to the request, and performing programming and needs assessments.

Special Circumstances

In special circumstances, approved by the Dean and/or Department Chair, faculty or staff office may be larger or smaller than standards. These circumstances might include:

  • Special or unusual building configurations that affect the efficiency of the space
  • Particular accessibility issues
  • Overall school and/or department space constraints or needs

New Construction and Renovations

The standards provide specific data for the planning and design of new buildings and renovation of existing spaces. They are designed to provide university departments, CPD, and Capital Projects and Construction a defined scale for the initial scoping, feasibility and programming phases of development. Through the various stages of planning and design, the space standards are intended to continue to serve as a reference for the size and layout of offices and office accessory components.

Variance from these standards may be justified, but would need to go through a case-by-case basis to ensure that the variance conforms to the guiding principles of efficient space use, the mission of the university and are approved.

Existing Spaces

Planning space within existing buildings is often affected by structural limitations, aging building systems, building configuration, or historic preservation. There are sometimes programs that “fit” more efficiently than others in specific buildings and spaces, but the latitude, cost, justification or inclination to relocate programs may not be feasible. Complex issues are involved in allocating and planning department spaces and meeting campus-wide space needs. When renovating existing space it may not be feasible to fully implement these standards and a variance may be required. An example of this would be a building with preexisting offices that are larger than the standards established in this document. The cost and energy involved in the demolition and reconstruction of these offices would not coincide with the guiding principles and the mission of the university.

When allocation and/or renovation of existing space occurs, Space Management, Capital Planning and Capital Programming units within Capital Planning and Development will work with departments for maximizing the efficiency, modularity, and flexibility of the space.

Older Buildings and Non-conforming Space

The OSU campus has a wide variety of building stock; dating from the late 1800s to the present day. Older buildings present challenges when it comes to remodeling and conforming to the standards presented here. In these situations, Space Management can assist with space planning with the goal of space utilization that meets programmatic needs within an older footprint.

Space Costs

The costs of building, renovating, operating and maintaining space at OSU are high. The ongoing operating costs of buildings on the OSU campus are even more significant over time. The magnitude of these costs makes it even more important for the university to use its space wisely and efficiency.

Space Data Codes

FICM

The Postsecondary Education Facilities Inventory and Classification Manual (FICM) describes standard practices for initiating, conducting, reporting, and maintaining a postsecondary institutional facilities inventory.  In 2015, OSU Space Management updated and revised space codes to align with FICM standards.

Functional Space Use Codes 

Functional Use Code represents the function or activity that occurs in this space.  Functional Use Codes are vital in determining indirect cost recovery of Facilities and Administrative (F&A) costs associated with sponsored agreements. Accurately tracking and maintaining costs associated with building and equipment depreciation and building O&M Costs is a mandatory requirement by the Office of Management and Budget. 

Facility Type Codes

Facility Type (room type) Codes identify the primary use of the room, how it is used and may reflect the physical characteristics of that space. For example, a room can be an office or a classroom, but not both.

Facility Type Codes

Facility Type (room type) Codes identify the primary use of the room, how it is used and may reflect the physical characteristics of that space. For example, a room can be an office or a classroom, but not both.

 

Category 100:  Classroom Facilities

  • General Purpose
  • Unit Dedicated
  • Seminar Learning
  • Service

Category 200:  Laboratory Facilities

  • Classroom Laboratory
    • Class Lab - Dry
    • Class Lab - Computer
    • Class Lab - Wet
    • Class Lab - Service
    • Class Lab - Environmental Control Room
  • Open Laboratory
    • Open Lab - Dry
    • Open Lab - Computer
    • Open Lab - Wet
    • Open Lab - Service
    • Open Lab - Environmental Control Room
    • Individual Study Lab
    • Student Practice Room
  • Research/Nonclass Laboratory Facilities
    • Research/Nonclass Lab - Dry
    • Research/Nonclass Lab - Computer
    • Research/Nonclass Lab - Wet
    • Research/Nonclass Lab - Service
    • Research/Nonclass Lab - Environmental Control Room

Category 300:  Office Facilities

  • Staff Office
  • Faculty Office
  • Administrative Office
  • Student Office
  • Office Service
  • Conference Room
  • Conference Room Service

Category 400:  Study Facilities

  • Study Space
  • Stack
  • Open-Stack Study Room
  • Processing Room
  • Study Service Space

Category 500:  Special Use Facilities

  • Armory (Military Support)
  • Armory Service
  • Athletic or Physical Education
  • Athletic Facilities Spectator Seating
  • Athletic or Physical Education Service
  • Locker Room
  • Locker Room Men
  • Locker Room Women
  • Media Production
  • Media Production Service
  • Clinic
  • Clinic Service
  • Demonstration
  • Demonstration Service
  • Field Building
  • Animal Facilities
  • Animal Facilities Service
  • Greenhouse
  • Greenhouse Service
  • Other (All Purpose)

Category 600:  General Use Facilities

  • Assembly
  • Assembly Service
  • Exhibition
  • Exhibition Service
  • Food Facility
  • Food Facility Service
  • Day Care
  • Day Care Service
  • Lounge
  • Lounge Service
  • Merchandising
  • Merchandising Service
  • Recreation
  • Recreation Service
  • Meeting Room
  • Meeting Room Service

Category 700:  Support Facilities

  • Central Computer or Telecommunications
  • Central Computer or Telecommunications Service
  • Shop
  • Shop Service
  • Central Storage
  • Central Storage Service
  • Vehicle Storage
  • Vehicle Storage Service
  • Central Service
  • Central Service Support
  • Hazardous Materials Storage
  • Hazardous Waste Storage
  • Hazardous Waste Service
  • Unit Storage

Category 800:  Health Care Facilities

  • Patient Bedroom
  • Patient Bedroom Service
  • Patient Bath
  • Nurse Station
  • Nurse Station Service
  • Surgery
  • Surgery Service
  • Treatment/Examination Clinic
  • Treatment/Examination Clinic Service
  • Diagnostic Service Laboratory
  • Diagnostic Service Laboratory Support
  • Central Supplies
  • Public Waiting
  • Staff On-Call Facility
  • Staff On-Call Facility Service

Category 900:  Residential Facilities

  • Sleep/Study Without Toilet or Bath
  • Toilet or Bath
  • Sleep/Study With Toilet or Bath
  • Sleep/Study Service
  • Apartment
  • Apartment Service
  • House

Category 000:  Unclassified Facilities

  • Inactive Area
  • Alteration or Conversion Area
  • Unfinished Area

Category W:  Circulation Areas

  • Bridge/Tunnel
  • Elevator
  • Escalator
  • Loading Dock
  • Lobby
  • Public Corridor
  • Stairway
  • Vestibule
  • Ramp

Category X:  Building Service Areas

  • Custodial Supply Closet / Janitor Room
  • Trash Room
  • Public Restroom
  • Public Restroom Men's
  • Public Restroom Women's
  • Public Shower
  • Lactation Room

Category Y:  Mechanical Areas

  • Central Utility Plant
  • Fuel Room
  • Shaft
  • Utility/Mechanical Space
  • Elevator Machinery

 

 

 

000: Unclassified Areas

 

Code# Code Name Definition  Description Limitations
050 Inactive Area Rooms available for assignment to an organizational unit or activity but unassigned at the time of the inventory.   Rooms being modified or not completed at the time of the inventory are classified as Alteration or Conversion Area (060) or Unfinished Area (070).
060 Alteration or Conversion Area Spaces temporarily out of use because they are being altered, remodeled, or rehabilitated at the time of the inventory.   Spaces inactive or not completed at the time of the inventory are classified as Inactive Area (050) and Unfinished Area (070), respectively.
070 Unfinished Area All potentially assignable areas in new buildings, shell space, or additions to existing buildings not completely finished at the time of the inventory.   Intended only for the unfinished part or shell area of a building or addition; the parts that are in use should be appropriately classified.

100: Classroom Facilities

 

 

Code# Code Name Definition  Description Limitations
110 Classroom - General Purpose A room used for class meetings that does not require special purpose equipment and is subject to regular assignment by the Scheduling Office Include rooms used for scheduled instruction usually referred to as general pool and/or departmentally controlled; classrooms, lecture rooms, and lecture-demonstration rooms which are equipped with tablet arm chairs, tables and chairs, or similar types of seating. Also included is a theater or auditorium if its principal use is for scheduled class meetings. These rooms may contain multimedia or telecommunications
equipment or be furnished with special equipment appropriate to a specific area of study if the equipment does not render the room unsuitable for use by classes in other areas of study. This category may include classrooms which have been set aside for a specific non-credit program. 
This category does not include conference rooms, class laboratories or auditoriums used for other than instructional purposes.
111 Classroom - Unit Dedicated A room used for class meetings that does not require special purpose equipment and is subject to regular assignment by the Departments Include rooms used for scheduled instruction usually referred to as general pool and/or departmentally controlled; classrooms, lecture rooms, and lecture-demonstration rooms which are equipped with tablet arm chairs, tables and chairs, or similar types of seating. Also included is a theater or auditorium if its principal use is for scheduled class meetings. These rooms may contain multimedia or telecommunications
equipment or be furnished with special equipment appropriate to a specific area of study if the equipment does not render the room unsuitable for use by classes in other areas of study. This category may include classrooms which have been set aside for a specific non-credit program. 
This category does not include conference rooms, class laboratories or auditoriums used for other than instructional purposes.
112 Classroom - Seminar Learning A room normally equipped with a table and chairs which is subject to regular assignment by the Scheduling Office and/or Departments.  Although seminar rooms are similar to classrooms they are generally smaller, equipped with table and chairs and scheduled for small, seminar type classes. Given Limited class size and configuration, Seminar Rooms are most often associated with graduate level instruction (GRADINST). A room usually scheduled for seminars would not necessarily indicate it should be classified as a Seminar Room if it is equipped in the normal classroom manner. Spaces defined as Conference Rooms may also be prorated and serve as Seminar Rooms.
115 Classroom - Service A space that directly serves one or more classrooms as an extension of the activities in that space. Includes projection rooms, telecommunications control booths, preparation rooms, coat rooms, closets, storage areas, etc., if they serve classrooms. Does not include projection rooms, coat rooms, preparation rooms, closets, or storage areas if such spaces serve laboratories, conference rooms, meeting rooms, assembly facilities, etc. A projection booth in an auditorium (not used primarily for scheduled classes) is classified as Assembly Service (615).

200: Laboratory Facilities

 

 

Code# Code Name Definition  Description Limitations
CLASS LABORATORY
210 Class Laboratory - Dry Area for material / data analysis or creative productions requiring common space. Dry lab can include sink but no fume hood which is considered a part of wet labs. Dry lab area is the primary function of the room.

A space used primarily for formally or regularly scheduled instruction (including associated mandatory, but non-credit-earning laboratories) that require special purpose equipment or a specific space configuration for student participation, experimentation, observation, or practice in an academic discipline. A space is considered to be scheduled if the activities generate weekly student contact hours (WSCHs), the activities fulfill course requirements, and/or there is a formal convener
present.
A class laboratory is designed for or furnished with equipment to serve the needs of a particular discipline for group instruction in formally or regularly scheduled classes. This special equipment normally limits or precludes the space’s use by other disciplines. Included in this category are spaces generally called teaching laboratories, instructional shops, computer laboratories, drafting rooms, band rooms, choral rooms, (group) music practice rooms, language laboratories, (group) studios, theater stage areas used primarily for instruction, instructional health laboratories, and similar specially designed or equipped rooms, if they are used primarily for group instruction in formally or regularly scheduled classes. Computer rooms used primarily to instruct students in the use of computers are classified as class laboratories if that instruction is conducted primarily in formally or regularly scheduled classes. Does not include Classrooms (110). Does not include informally scheduled or unscheduled laboratories (see Open Laboratory-220). This category does not include spaces generally defined as Research/Nonclass Laboratories (250). It does not include gymnasia, pools, drill halls, laboratory schools, demonstration houses, and similar facilities that are included under Special Use Facilities (Code 500 series). Computer rooms in libraries or used primarily for study should be classified as Study Rooms (410).
211 Class Laboratory - Computer Area  which is designated for the use of networked computers. Printers, scanners and other peripherals may augment the computer lab setup. OSU IT services such as telecommunication or networking routers would not be in computer labs. They are dedicated to computer use and are not banks of computers (as along a wall) that are shared with conventional classroom or office space.

A space used primarily for formally or regularly scheduled instruction (including associated mandatory, but non-credit-earning laboratories) that require special purpose equipment or a specific space configuration for student participation, experimentation, observation, or practice in an academic discipline. A space is considered to be scheduled if the activities generate weekly student contact hours (WSCHs), the activities fulfill course requirements, and/or there is a formal convener
present.
A class laboratory is designed for or furnished with equipment to serve the needs of a particular discipline for group instruction in formally or regularly scheduled classes. This special equipment normally limits or precludes the space’s use by other disciplines. Included in this category are spaces generally called teaching laboratories, instructional shops, computer laboratories, drafting rooms, band rooms, choral rooms, (group) music practice rooms, language laboratories, (group) studios, theater stage areas used primarily for instruction, instructional health laboratories, and similar specially designed or equipped rooms, if they are used primarily for group instruction in formally or regularly scheduled classes. Computer rooms used primarily to instruct students in the use of computers are classified as class laboratories if that instruction is conducted primarily in formally or regularly scheduled classes. Does not include Classrooms (110). Does not include informally scheduled or unscheduled laboratories (see Open Laboratory-220). This category does not include spaces generally defined as Research/Nonclass Laboratories (250). It does not include gymnasia, pools, drill halls, laboratory schools, demonstration houses, and similar facilities that are included under Special Use Facilities (Code 500 series). Computer rooms in libraries or used primarily for study should be classified as Study Rooms (410).
212 Class Laboratory - Wet Area where chemicals, drugs, or other material or biological matter are tested and analyzed requiring water, direct ventilation, and/or specialized piped (plumbing) utilities. Fume hoods emergency wash systems, and sinks are common in wet labs. Wet lab area is the primary function of the room.

A space used primarily for formally or regularly scheduled instruction (including associated mandatory, but non-credit-earning laboratories) that require special purpose equipment or a specific space configuration for student participation, experimentation, observation, or practice in an academic discipline. A space is considered to be scheduled if the activities generate weekly student contact hours (WSCHs), the activities fulfill course requirements, and/or there is a formal convener
present.
A class laboratory is designed for or furnished with equipment to serve the needs of a particular discipline for group instruction in formally or regularly scheduled classes. This special equipment normally limits or precludes the space’s use by other disciplines. Included in this category are spaces generally called teaching laboratories, instructional shops, computer laboratories, drafting rooms, band rooms, choral rooms, (group) music practice rooms, language laboratories, (group) studios, theater stage areas used primarily for instruction, instructional health laboratories, and similar specially designed or equipped rooms, if they are used primarily for group instruction in formally or regularly scheduled classes. Computer rooms used primarily to instruct students in the use of computers are classified as class laboratories if that instruction is conducted primarily in formally or regularly scheduled classes. Does not include Classrooms (110). Does not include informally scheduled or unscheduled laboratories (see Open Laboratory-220). This category does not include spaces generally defined as Research/Nonclass Laboratories (250). It does not include gymnasia, pools, drill halls, laboratory schools, demonstration houses, and similar facilities that are included under Special Use Facilities (Code 500 series). Computer rooms in libraries or used primarily for study should be classified as Study Rooms (410).
215 Class Laboratory - Service A space that directly serves one or more class laboratories as an extension of the activities in those spaces. Includes any space that directly serves a class laboratory. Included are projection rooms, telecommunications control booths, coat rooms, preparation rooms, closets, material storage (including temporary hazardous materials storage), balance rooms, cold rooms, stock rooms, dark rooms, equipment issue rooms, etc., if they serve class laboratories. Does not include service spaces that support a Classroom (see 115), Open Laboratory (see 225), or a Research/Nonclass Laboratory (see 255). Animal Facilities (570), Greenhouse (580), and Central Service (750) facilities are categorized separately.
216 Class Laboratory - Environment Control Room A room used for experimentation under specifically controlled environmental circumstances.    Do not include in this category greenhouses or refrigeration rooms in food preparation and serving areas.
OPEN LABORATORY
220 Open Laboratory - Dry Area for material / data analysis or creative productions requiring common space. Dry lab can include sink but no fume hood which is considered a part of wet labs. Dry lab area is the primary function of the room.

A laboratory used primarily for individual or group instruction that is informally scheduled, unscheduled, or open.
An open laboratory is designed for or furnished with equipment that serves the needs of a particular discipline or discipline group for individual or group instruction where 1) use of the space is not formally or regularly scheduled, or 2) access is limited to specific groups of students. Included in this category are spaces generally called music practice rooms, language laboratories used for individualized instruction, studios for individualized instruction, special laboratories or learning laboratories (e.g., speech, hearing, law, psychology, and health-related professions) if discipline restricted, individual laboratories, and computer laboratories involving specialized restrictive software or where access is limited to specific categories of students. For example, a computer laboratory with only engineering or CAD software or a computer-based writing laboratory available only to English Composition students would be classified as an open laboratory because of the restricted usage of the space for a particular discipline or discipline group. Spaces containing computer equipment that is not restricted to a specific discipline or discipline group are classified as Study Rooms (410) unless the primary intent is to function as a site for structured learning or group activities rather than individual knowledge acquisition. Laboratories with formally or regularly scheduled classes are classified as a Class Laboratory (210). This category also does not include spaces defined as Research/Nonclass Laboratory (250). A space that contains equipment (e.g., microcomputers), which does not restrict use to a specific discipline or discipline group and which is typically used at a student’s convenience, should be classified as a Study Room (410).
221 Open Laboratory - Computer Area which is designated for the use of networked computers. Printers, scanners and other peripherals may augment the computer lab setup. OSU IT services such as telecommunication or networking routers would not be in computer labs. They are dedicated to computer use and are not banks of computers (as along a wall) that are shared with conventional classroom or office space.

A laboratory used primarily for individual or group instruction that is informally scheduled, unscheduled, or open.
An open laboratory is designed for or furnished with equipment that serves the needs of a particular discipline or discipline group for individual or group instruction where 1) use of the space is not formally or regularly scheduled, or 2) access is limited to specific groups of students. Included in this category are spaces generally called music practice rooms, language laboratories used for individualized instruction, studios for individualized instruction, special laboratories or learning laboratories (e.g., speech, hearing, law, psychology, and health-related professions) if discipline restricted, individual laboratories, and computer laboratories involving specialized restrictive software or where access is limited to specific categories of students. For example, a computer laboratory with only engineering or CAD software or a computer-based writing laboratory available only to English Composition students would be classified as an open laboratory because of the restricted usage of the space for a particular discipline or discipline group. Spaces containing computer equipment that is not restricted to a specific discipline or discipline group are classified as Study Rooms (410) unless the primary intent is to function as a site for structured learning or group activities rather than individual knowledge acquisition. Laboratories with formally or regularly scheduled classes are classified as a Class Laboratory (210). This category also does not include spaces defined as Research/Nonclass Laboratory (250). A space that contains equipment (e.g., microcomputers), which does not restrict use to a specific discipline or discipline group and which is typically used at a student’s convenience, should be classified as a Study Room (410).
222 Open Laboratory - Wet Area where chemicals, drugs, or other material or biological matter are tested and analyzed requiring water, direct ventilation, and/or specialized piped (plumbing) utilities. Fume hoods emergency wash systems, and sinks are common in wet labs. Wet lab area is the primary function of the room.

A laboratory used primarily for individual or group instruction that is informally scheduled, unscheduled, or open.
An open laboratory is designed for or furnished with equipment that serves the needs of a particular discipline or discipline group for individual or group instruction where 1) use of the space is not formally or regularly scheduled, or 2) access is limited to specific groups of students. Included in this category are spaces generally called music practice rooms, language laboratories used for individualized instruction, studios for individualized instruction, special laboratories or learning laboratories (e.g., speech, hearing, law, psychology, and health-related professions) if discipline restricted, individual laboratories, and computer laboratories involving specialized restrictive software or where access is limited to specific categories of students. For example, a computer laboratory with only engineering or CAD software or a computer-based writing laboratory available only to English Composition students would be classified as an open laboratory because of the restricted usage of the space for a particular discipline or discipline group. Spaces containing computer equipment that is not restricted to a specific discipline or discipline group are classified as Study Rooms (410) unless the primary intent is to function as a site for structured learning or group activities rather than individual knowledge acquisition. Laboratories with formally or regularly scheduled classes are classified as a Class Laboratory (210). This category also does not include spaces defined as Research/Nonclass Laboratory (250). A space that contains equipment (e.g., microcomputers), which does not restrict use to a specific discipline or discipline group and which is typically used at a student’s convenience, should be classified as a Study Room (410).
225 Open Laboratory - Service A space that directly serves one or more open laboratories as an extension of the activities in those spaces. Includes only those spaces that directly serve an open laboratory. Included are projection rooms, telecommunications control booths, coat rooms, preparation rooms, closets, material storage (including temporary hazardous materials storage), balance rooms, cold rooms, stock rooms, dark rooms, equipment issue rooms, and similar facilities, if they serve open laboratories. Does not include service spaces that support a Classroom (see 115), Class Laboratory (see 215), or Research/Nonclass Laboratory (see 255). Animal Facilities (570), Greenhouse (580), and Central Service (750) facilities are categorized separately.
226 Open Laboratory - Environment Control Room A room used for experimentation under specifically controlled environmental circumstances.    Do not include in this category greenhouses or refrigeration rooms in food preparation and serving areas.
231 Individual Study Laboratory A room especially equipped and/or designed for individual student experimentation, observation, practice or study in a particular field of study.  Include rooms (which may have multiple stations) which serve a particular subject matter area. These rooms or stations are normally assigned to individuals for their own use.  This category does not include individual study facilities which are intended for general study purposes. 
232 Student Practice Room A specially equipped and/or designed room for group or individual student experimentation, observation or practice in a particular field of study.  Include music studios, speech practice rooms, small rooms used for practice by individual students or very small groups (a large room used for instruction of and practice by a group such as a band, orchestra, ensemble, etc., is usually classified as a class laboratory). This type of space is generally not assigned to any particular individual. A music studio assigned to a faculty member which serves as a combination faculty office and music studio should be classified as Faculty Office. This category does not include music studios which are generally larger than the music practice room and are designed to accommodate several persons at one time. 
Research/Nonclass Laboratory
250 Research/Nonclass Laboratory - Dry Area for material / data analysis or creative productions requiring common space. Dry lab can include sink but no fume hood which is considered a part of wet labs. Dry lab area is the primary function of the room.

A space used for laboratory experimentation, research, or training in research methods; professional research and observation; or structured creative activity within a specific program or for sponsored research (whether sponsored with federal, state, private, or institutional funds).
A research/nonclass laboratory is designed or equipped for faculty, staff, and students for the conduct of research and controlled or structured creative activities. These activities are generally confined to faculty, staff, and assigned graduate students and are applicable to any academic discipline. Activities may include experimentation, application, observation, composition, or research training in a structured environment directed by one or more faculty or principal investigators. These activities do not include practice or independent study projects and activities that, although delivering “new knowledge” to a student, are not intended for a broader academic (or sponsoring) community (e.g., a presentation or publication). This category includes laboratories that are used for experiments, testing, or “dry runs” in support of instructional, research, or public service activities. Nonclass public service laboratories that promote new knowledge in academic fields (e.g., animal diagnostic laboratories, cooperative extension laboratories) are included in this category. Student practice activity rooms should be classified under Open Laboratory (220). A combination office/music or art studio or combination office/research laboratory should be coded according to its primary use if only a single space use code can be applied. Determination also should be made whether the “studio” or “research lab” component involves developing new knowledge (or extending the application or distribution of existing knowledge) for a broader academic or sponsoring community (and not merely for the practitioner), or the activity is merely practice or learning within the applied instructional process. Primary use should be the determining criterion in either case. Does not include testing or monitoring facilities (e.g., seed sampling, water or environmental testing rooms) that are part of an institution’s Central Service (750) system. Also does not include the often unstructured, spontaneous or improvisational creative activities of learning and practice within the performing arts that take place in (scheduled) Class Laboratories (210) or, if not specifically scheduled, (practice) Open Laboratories (220). Such performing arts (and other science and nonscience) activities, which are controlled or structured to the extent that they are intended to produce a specific research or experimental outcome (e.g., a new or advanced technique), are included in the Research/Nonclass Laboratory (250) category.
251 Research/Nonclass Laboratory - Computer Area which is designated for the use of networked computers. Printers, scanners and other peripherals may augment the computer lab setup. OSU IT services such as telecommunication or networking routers would not be in computer labs. They are dedicated to computer use and are not banks of computers (as along a wall) that are shared with conventional classroom or office space.

A space used for laboratory experimentation, research, or training in research methods; professional research and observation; or structured creative activity within a specific program or for sponsored research (whether sponsored with federal, state, private, or institutional funds).
A research/nonclass laboratory is designed or equipped for faculty, staff, and students for the conduct of research and controlled or structured creative activities. These activities are generally confined to faculty, staff, and assigned graduate students and are applicable to any academic discipline. Activities may include experimentation, application, observation, composition, or research training in a structured environment directed by one or more faculty or principal investigators. These activities do not include practice or independent study projects and activities that, although delivering “new knowledge” to a student, are not intended for a broader academic (or sponsoring) community (e.g., a presentation or publication). This category includes laboratories that are used for experiments, testing, or “dry runs” in support of instructional, research, or public service activities. Nonclass public service laboratories that promote new knowledge in academic fields (e.g., animal diagnostic laboratories, cooperative extension laboratories) are included in this category. Student practice activity rooms should be classified under Open Laboratory (220). A combination office/music or art studio or combination office/research laboratory should be coded according to its primary use if only a single space use code can be applied. Determination also should be made whether the “studio” or “research lab” component involves developing new knowledge (or extending the application or distribution of existing knowledge) for a broader academic or sponsoring community (and not merely for the practitioner), or the activity is merely practice or learning within the applied instructional process. Primary use should be the determining criterion in either case. Does not include testing or monitoring facilities (e.g., seed sampling, water or environmental testing rooms) that are part of an institution’s Central Service (750) system. Also does not include the often unstructured, spontaneous or improvisational creative activities of learning and practice within the performing arts that take place in (scheduled) Class Laboratories (210) or, if not specifically scheduled, (practice) Open Laboratories (220). Such performing arts (and other science and nonscience) activities, which are controlled or structured to the extent that they are intended to produce a specific research or experimental outcome (e.g., a new or advanced technique), are included in the Research/Nonclass Laboratory (250) category.
252 Research/Nonclass Laboratory - Wet Area where chemicals, drugs, or other material or biological matter are tested and analyzed requiring water, direct ventilation, and/or specialized piped (plumbing) utilities. Fume hoods emergency wash systems, and sinks are common in wet labs. Wet lab area is the primary function of the room.

A space used for laboratory experimentation, research, or training in research methods; professional research and observation; or structured creative activity within a specific program or for sponsored research (whether sponsored with federal, state, private, or institutional funds).
A research/nonclass laboratory is designed or equipped for faculty, staff, and students for the conduct of research and controlled or structured creative activities. These activities are generally confined to faculty, staff, and assigned graduate students and are applicable to any academic discipline. Activities may include experimentation, application, observation, composition, or research training in a structured environment directed by one or more faculty or principal investigators. These activities do not include practice or independent study projects and activities that, although delivering “new knowledge” to a student, are not intended for a broader academic (or sponsoring) community (e.g., a presentation or publication). This category includes laboratories that are used for experiments, testing, or “dry runs” in support of instructional, research, or public service activities. Nonclass public service laboratories that promote new knowledge in academic fields (e.g., animal diagnostic laboratories, cooperative extension laboratories) are included in this category. Student practice activity rooms should be classified under Open Laboratory (220). A combination office/music or art studio or combination office/research laboratory should be coded according to its primary use if only a single space use code can be applied. Determination also should be made whether the “studio” or “research lab” component involves developing new knowledge (or extending the application or distribution of existing knowledge) for a broader academic or sponsoring community (and not merely for the practitioner), or the activity is merely practice or learning within the applied instructional process. Primary use should be the determining criterion in either case. Does not include testing or monitoring facilities (e.g., seed sampling, water or environmental testing rooms) that are part of an institution’s Central Service (750) system. Also does not include the often unstructured, spontaneous or improvisational creative activities of learning and practice within the performing arts that take place in (scheduled) Class Laboratories (210) or, if not specifically scheduled, (practice) Open Laboratories (220). Such performing arts (and other science and nonscience) activities, which are controlled or structured to the extent that they are intended to produce a specific research or experimental outcome (e.g., a new or advanced technique), are included in the Research/Nonclass Laboratory (250) category.
255 Research/Nonclass Laboratory - Service A space that directly serves one or more research/nonclass laboratories as an extension of the activities in those spaces. Includes only those spaces that directly serve a research/nonclass laboratory. Included are projection rooms, telecommunications control booths, coat
rooms, preparation rooms, closets, material storage, balance rooms, cold rooms, stock rooms, dark rooms, equipment issue rooms, temporary hazardous materials storage areas, and similar facilities, if they serve research/nonclass laboratories.
Does not include service spaces that support a Classrooms (see 115), Class Laboratory (see 215), or Open Laboratory (see 225). Animal Facilities (570), Greenhouse (580), and Central Service (750) facilities are categorized separately.
256 Research/Nonclass Laboratory - Environment Control Room A room used for experimentation under specifically controlled environmental circumstances.    Do not include in this category greenhouses or refrigeration rooms in food preparation and serving areas.

300: Office Facilities

 

Code# Code Name Definition  Description Limitations
310 Staff Office An office used by staff in the performance of their regularly assigned duties. Include rooms generally occupied by Classified, Wage-Worker or Temporary Hire personnel including clerical, stenographic, receptionist and also any management personnel not included as an administrative position. Included in this category is space where any machines, files and reception areas are in the same room with clerical personnel and where such space is incidental to the office function. Large rooms such as glass shops, painting shops, etc., which have a desk for a technician or staff member are classified according to the primary purpose of the room rather than a staff office. The office portion may be prorated out, however. 
311 Faculty Office A room assigned to a faculty member for the performance of duties other than the meeting of classes.  Include all offices used by faculty, including heads of instructional departments below the rank of dean; associate and assistant deans budgeted to other than instruction and serving a portion of the institution; graduate assistants, research associates and teaching associates, and post doctorate fellows for instructional or research purposes, instructional preparation, counseling, etc. A studio in the department of music or fine arts assigned to one or more faculty members for their own work even though occasionally used for a student lesson should be classified as a faculty office. Faculty Offices are by definition used for Instructional Support. They may be prorated with Office Research Lab, if they are also used for Departmental or Sponsored Research. Faculty Offices may also be prorated with Staff Offices when occupants use the space to provide both instructional support and administration.
312 Administrative Office A room or suite of rooms used by administrative personnel for the performance of administrative duties.  Include rooms generally referred to as the offices of presidents, business managers, all deans, associate and assistant deans serving the entire institution (such as deans of administration, faculty and graduate school), registrars, directors of admissions, dean of students, placement directors and director of student counseling.  Do not include clerical, stenographic or other general office space. 
313 Student Office An office or portion of an office used by employed students for the performance of duties other than the meeting of classes. Include all office space occupied by employed students, including Graduate Research Assistant (GRA), Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA), Work Study Students and Practicum. Do not include space for non-employed or non-paid volunteers. These should be included as part of supervised ADMIN or STAFF space.
315 Office Service A space that directly serves an office or group of offices as an extension of the activities in those spaces. Includes file rooms, break rooms, kitchenettes serving office areas, copy and fax rooms, vaults, closets, private rest rooms not available to the public, records rooms, office supply rooms, first aid rooms serving office areas, student counseling rooms and testing (assessment, nonhealth, non-discipline-related) rooms, and open and private (restricted/nonpublic) circulation areas. Waiting, interview, and testing spaces are included as Office Service if they serve a specific office or office area and not a classroom laboratory or clinic. A student counseling (nonhealth) testing room should be coded as Office Service (315). A receptionist room that includes a waiting area should be coded as Office (310). Lounges that serve specific office areas and that are not generally available to the public should be coded as Office Service (315). Centralized mail rooms, shipping or receiving areas, and duplicating or printing shops that serve more than one building (or department or school, etc.) or that are campus-wide in scope should be classified Central Service (750). Does not include Unit Storage (780).
350 Conference Room A space serving an office complex and used primarily for staff meetings and departmental activities. A conference space is typically equipped with tables and chairs. Normally it is used by a specific organizational unit or office area, whereas Meeting Rooms (680) are used for general purposes such as community or campus group meetings not associated with a particular department. If a space is used for both conference and meeting space functions, then the space should be classified according to its principal use. A conference space is distinguished from facilities such as seminar rooms, lecture rooms, and Classrooms (110) because it is used primarily for activities other than scheduled classes. A conference space is intended primarily for formal gatherings, whereas a lounge is intended for relaxation and casual interaction. This category includes teleconference spaces. Does not include classrooms, seminar rooms, lecture rooms (see Classrooms-110), auditoria (see Assembly-610), departmental lounges (see Office Service-315), open lounges (see Lounge-650), and Meeting Rooms (680).
355 Conference Room Service A space that directly serves one or more conference spaces as an extension of the activities in those spaces. Includes kitchenettes, storage spaces, telecommunications control booths, projection rooms, sound equipment rooms, etc., if they serve conference spaces. Excluded are service spaces that support meeting spaces (see Meeting Room Service-685) or offices (see Office Service-315).

400: Study Facilities

 

Code# Code Name Definition  Description Limitations
410 Study Space A room or area used by individuals to study at their convenience, the space not being restricted to a particular subject or discipline by contained equipment. Includes study or reading rooms located in libraries, residential facilities, academic or student service facilities, study carrel and booth areas, and similar spaces that are intended for general study purposes. Study stations may be grouped, as in a library reading room, or individualized, as in a carrel. Study stations may include computers, typewriters, microform readers, CD and DVD players, or other multimedia equipment. The category Study Space includes spaces commonly termed “learning labs” or “computer labs” if they are not restricted to specific disciplines by contained equipment or software. Study spaces are primarily used by students or staff for learning at their convenience, although access may be restricted by a controlling unit (e.g., departmental study room). Does not include Open Laboratories (220) that are restricted to a particular discipline or discipline group. This category also does not include Lounges (650) that are intended for relaxation and casual interaction.
420 Stack A space used to house arranged collections of educational materials for use as a study resource. Stacks typically appear in central, branch, or departmental libraries and are characterized by accessible, arranged, and managed collections. Collections can include books, periodicals, journals, monographs, micro-materials, electronic storage media (e.g., tapes, disks, slides, etc.), musical scores, maps, and other educational materials. Does not include general storage areas for such materials that serve a particular room or area; such spaces would take the appropriate service code. Examples of these service spaces include tape storage rooms for language laboratories (see Open Laboratory Service-225), book storage rooms for classrooms (see Classroom Service-115), and music for general listening enjoyment (see Recreation Service-675). Also does not include collections of educational materials, regardless of form or type (i.e., from books to soils collections), that are for Exhibition (620) use rather than for study or reference.
430 Open-Stack Study Room A combination study space and stack, generally without physical boundaries between the stack and study areas. Seating areas include those types of station and seating arrangements described under Study Room (410). The stack areas of these spaces may include any of the educational material collections described under Stack (420). Does not include Study Rooms (410) that have no stack areas. Those stack areas that have only a few incidental chairs or other seating, without a formally arranged study seating area, should be coded Stack (420). Institutions may wish to separate and code the seating or study areas (see Study Room-410) and Stack areas (see Stack-420) into separate space records. As with Stack (420) and Processing Rooms (440), Open-Stack Study Rooms (430) appear primarily in central, branch, and departmental libraries.
440 Processing Room A room or area devoted to processes and operations in support of library functions. A processing room is intended for specific library operations that support the overall library mission. Included are card and microfiche areas, reference desk and circulation desk areas, bookbinding rooms, multimedia materials processing areas, interlibrary loan processing areas, and other areas with a specific process or operation in support of library functions. Areas that serve both as office stations and processing rooms should be coded according to primary use. Small incidental processing areas in larger stack or study areas should be included within the larger primary activity category (see Codes 410, 420, and 430). Does not include typical support spaces that serve study and other primary activity areas, such as storage rooms, copy rooms, closets, and other service type spaces (see Code 455). Acquisitions work areas with a primary office use should be classified as Office (310).
455 Study Service A space that directly serves study spaces, stacks, open-stack study spaces, or processing rooms as a direct extension of the activities in those spaces. Includes storage spaces, copy rooms, closets, locker rooms, coat rooms, and other typical service areas that support a primary study facilities room (see Codes 410, 420, 430, and 440). With the increasing implementation of wireless technology, service areas are migrating into the primary study space and stacks. Campuses need to adopt a consistent approach to using either predominate use or “phantom walls” to allow for the separation of service space. An example would be space occupied by routers, servers, or battery-charging equipment on the open floor of a library or student center. Does not include Processing Rooms (440) that house specific library support processes and operations (e.g., bookbinding rooms, multimedia processing rooms).

500: Special Use Facilities

 

 

Code# Code Name Definition  Description Limitations
510 Armory (Military Support) A room or area used by Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) and ancillary units for military training and/or instructional activities. Spaces that are obviously designed or equipped for use in a military training or instructional program, such as indoor drill areas, indoor rifle ranges, and specially designed or equipped military science rooms, are included in this category. Ancillary units may include special rifle and drill teams. Conventional space use types such as Classrooms (110), Class Laboratories (210), Offices (310), and Study Rooms (410) are designated as such, even though they are located in an armory building. Military supply and weapons rooms are coded Armory Service (515).
515 Armory Service A space that directly serves an armory facility as an extension of the activities in that facility. This category includes supply rooms, weapons rooms, and military equipment storage rooms. Spaces directly serving conventional primary activity areas are classified with the appropriate corresponding service code, e.g., Classroom Service (115), Class Laboratory Service (215), Office Service (315), and Study Service (455).
520 Athletic or Physical Education A room or area used by students, staff, or the public for athletic or physical education activities. Includes gymnasia, basketball courts, handball courts, squash courts, wrestling rooms, weight or exercise rooms, racquetball courts, indoor swimming pools, indoor putting areas, indoor ice rinks, indoor tracks, indoor stadium fields, and field houses. This category includes spaces used for dancing and bowling. This space use code does not distinguish instructional from intercollegiate, intramural, or recreational use of these areas.
• Classroom Facilities (Code 100 series), Laboratory Facilities (Code 200 series), Office Facilities (Code 300 series), and other primary space use categories are coded as such, even though these areas may be located in an athletic or physical education building. Permanent covered spectator seating areas associated with athletic facilities are coded Athletic Facilities Spectator Seating (523). Outdoor athletic areas, such as outdoor tennis and basketball courts, archery ranges, golf courses, and other outdoor fields, do not meet the definition of buildings and, therefore, are not assignable areas. Recreational or amusement areas such as billiards rooms, game or arcade rooms, table tennis rooms, chess and card playing rooms, and hobby and music listening areas are classified Recreation (670).
523 Athletic Facilities Spectator Seating The covered seating area used by students, staff, or the public to watch athletic events. Includes covered permanent or fixed seating areas in gymnasia, field houses, ice arenas, covered stadia, natatorium, and cycling arenas. Does not include temporary or movable seating areas (e.g., movable bleachers). Uncovered permanent seating is not assignable space although space below it may contain assignable areas (e.g., locker rooms, offices, etc.).
525 Athletic or Physical Education Service A space that directly serves an athletic or physical education facility as an extension of the activities in that facility. Includes locker rooms; shower rooms; nonoffice coaches’ rooms; ticket booths; and spaces for dressing, equipment, supply, storage, first aid, skate-sharpening, towels, etc. Does not include public rest rooms, which should be classified as nonassignable building service space. Spaces that directly serve offices, classrooms, laboratories, etc., are classified with the appropriate corresponding service code. Cashiers’ desks serving recreation facilities (see Recreation-670) are classified Recreation Service (675). Central ticket outlets serving multiple facilities or services are classified as Merchandising (660).
526 Locker Room A room equipped with all or just one of the following. Lockers used for changing and storing clothes, showers, or bathroom. Include rooms in gymnasiums or other buildings which contain lockers used by faculty, staff and students for changing and storing of their clothes. Do not include dressing rooms in the theater, etc. (see code 057). 
527 Locker Room Men A room equipped with all or just one of the following. Lockers used for changing and storing clothes, showers, or bathroom. Include rooms in gymnasiums or other buildings which contain lockers used by faculty, staff and students for changing and storing of their clothes. Do not include dressing rooms in the theater, etc. (see code 057). 
528 Locker Room Women A room equipped with all or just one of the following. Lockers used for changing and storing clothes, showers, or bathroom. Include rooms in gymnasiums or other buildings which contain lockers used by faculty, staff and students for changing and storing of their clothes. Do not include dressing rooms in the theater, etc. (see code 057). 
530 Media Production A space used for the production or distribution of multimedia materials or signals. Includes spaces generally called TV studios, radio studios, sound studios, photo studios, video or audio cassette and software production or distribution rooms, and media centers. These spaces have a clearly defined production or distribution function that serves a broader area (e.g., department, entire campus) than would a typical service room. Include electronic visualization studios or facilities in this category if the primary use is the production of media rather than a student-focused learning experience. Does not include spaces that merely store media materials and equipment. Such spaces would be coded as Media Production Service (535) spaces if serving the primary production or distribution room, or the appropriate service category for space(s) they serve. Radio or TV broadcasting areas, simulation laboratories, and other media spaces used for teaching broadcasting to students should be coded as laboratories (see Class Laboratory-210, or Open Laboratory-220). This classification also does not include centralized computer-based data processing and telecommunications equipment facilities (see Central Computer or Telecommunications-710).
535 Media Production Service A space that directly serves a media production or distribution space as an extension of the activities in that facility. The primary criterion here is that the space should serve a media
production or distribution space and not another primary activity space. Examples include film, tape, or cassette libraries or storage areas; media equipment storage rooms; recording rooms; engineering maintenance rooms; dark rooms; preparation rooms; studio control booths; and other support areas that specifically serve a media production or distribution room (see Media Production-530).
Those spaces containing media materials, equipment, or operations that serve other than a Media Production (530) primary activity space should be assigned the appropriate corresponding service code.
540 Clinic A space used for providing diagnosis, consultation, treatment, or other services to patients or clients or subjects with a primary purpose of instruction, research, or public service. Included are examination rooms, testing rooms, consultation rooms, and holding areas. Such spaces and their related uses are typically associated with educational programs such as psychology, law, speech, and hearing. Does not include spaces used for remedial instruction that should be classified as classrooms or laboratories (see Codes 100 and 200 series), testing or counseling rooms in nonhealth or non-discipline-related programs (see Office Service-315), or Health Care Facilities (see Code 800 series).
545 Clinic Service A space that directly serves a clinic as an extension of the activities in that space. Included are waiting rooms, observation rooms, control rooms, records rooms, diagnostic laboratories, and similar supporting spaces. Does not include spaces that serve health care facilities (see Code 800 series). Also does not include first aid treatment rooms that serve other primary activity areas, e.g., Athletic or Physical Education Service (525), Day Care Service (645).
550 Demonstration A room or group of spaces used to practice, within an instructional program, the principles of certain disciplines such as teaching, child care or development, and family and consumer science. The key criterion here is practice activity within an instructional program that closely simulates a real-world or occupational setting. Includes demonstration day care and development centers, laboratory schools, and family and consumer science houses when these facilities are used for practice as a part of postsecondary training or instruction. Does not include day care and development centers that are not used as part of an instructional program (see Day Care-640). This category also does not include laboratories (see Code 200 series) that are used for direct delivery of instruction as opposed to practice. Demonstration schools, laboratory schools, day care centers, and family and consumer science houses in which students serve as the subjects for a research study are classified as Research/Nonclass Laboratories (250).
555 Demonstration Service A space that directly serves a demonstration facility as an extension of the activities in that facility. Includes facilities generally called storerooms, pantries, etc., in a family and consumer science facility; and kitchens, lockers, shower rooms, etc., in a laboratory school. Similar support spaces that directly serve primary care and training areas in a demonstration day care center (see Demonstration-550) are included in this category. Generally, the primary activity areas—such as kitchen, dining room, living room (in a family and consumer science house), or classrooms, laboratories, gymnasia that serve nursery, elementary, or secondary school students (in a laboratory school)—should be designated as Demonstration (550). Primary care and training areas in a (practice) day care center are also Demonstration (550) spaces. Kitchen and food preparation spaces in a demonstration day care facility are classified as service areas. Eating or break rooms for staff in demonstration day care centers are classified as service areas other than Demonstration Service (555); eating or training spaces for children are classified as primary activity areas, Demonstration (550).
560 Field Building A barn or similar agricultural structure used for animal shelters or for the handling, storage, or protection of farm products, supplies, vehicles, or implements. Includes barns, animal and poultry shelters, sheds, silos, feed units, and hay storage. Structures are typically of light-frame construction with unfinished interiors and are frequently located outside the central campus area. Also includes storage space for farm vehicles and implements. Service areas that support field buildings are classified within this category. Animal facilities directly supporting research or instructional laboratories should be coded Animal Facilities (570). Location of a building, on or off the main campus, is not sufficient justification for classification as a field building. Finished spaces with other uses (e.g., laboratories, classrooms, etc.) should be coded as appropriate. Does not include buildings that house nonagricultural or non-farm-related vehicles (see Vehicle Storage-740).
570 Animal Facilities A space that houses laboratory animals used for research and/or instructional purposes. Includes animal rooms; cage rooms; stalls; wards; and procedure, operating, recovery, isolation, quarantine, and similar spaces for instruction and research. Animal Facilities are typically subject to the rules and regulations of agencies regarding the care and use of laboratory animals (e.g., requirements of the American Association for Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care (AAALAC)). Does not include agricultural field buildings sheltering animals that do not directly support instruction or research (see Field Building-560). Does not include areas that directly serve facilities used for the treatment of animals (see Treatment/Examination Clinic–850)
575 Animal Facilities Service A space that directly serves an animal quarters facility as an extension of the activities in that facility. Includes feed storage rooms, feed mixing rooms, cage washing rooms, cage storage rooms, casting rooms, instrument rooms, and internal (nonpublic) circulation space. Does not include areas that directly serve facilities used for the treatment of animals (see Treatment/Examination Clinic-850).
580 Greenhouse A building or space, usually composed chiefly of glass, plastic, or other light-transmitting material, that is used for the cultivation or protection of plants or seedlings for research, instruction, or campus physical maintenance or improvement purposes. The primary criterion here is the combination of structural design as a greenhouse and the use for cultivation or protection. An example would be a greenhouse that serves as a laboratory or service area for a botany or other (e.g., horticulture) educational program. This category includes any facility serving the greenhouse function (e.g., warehouse facilities equipped with special lighting controls for the cultivation or protection of plants). Greenhouses that are not used for plant cultivation or protection should be classified according to specific use (e.g., a greenhouse used for central storage should be coded Central Storage-730).
585 Greenhouse Service A space that directly serves a greenhouse facility as an extension of the activities in that facility. Includes equipment or materials storage areas and rooms generally called head houses. Excludes storage areas that do not directly serve greenhouses.
590 Other (All Purpose) A category of last resort. Included as a category of last resort to be used only for those spaces or facilities that cannot be described, even approximately, with other codes and definitions. Should have very limited use, if used at all.

600: General Use Facilities

 

Code# Code Name Definition  Description Limitations
610 Assembly A space designed and equipped for the assembly of many persons for such events as dramatic, musical, devotional, livestock judging, or commencement activities. Includes theaters, auditoria, concert halls, arenas, chapels, and livestock judging pavilions that are used primarily for general presentations (speakers), performances (dramatic, musical, dance), and devotional services. Seating areas, orchestra pits, chancels, aisles, and stages (if not used primarily for instruction) are included in and usually aggregated into the assembly space. This category also includes chapels located in health care, residential, or other facilities. Institutions may wish to separate the seating area from the stage and other specially configured areas through the use of additional codes. Stage areas used primarily for instruction or practice (dance, music, drama) are typically coded separately as laboratory space (see Codes 210, 220). Assembly facilities that are used primarily as instructional lecture halls are classified as Classroom (110) space.
615 Assembly Service A room or area that directly serves an assembly facility as an extension of the activities in that facility. Includes check rooms, coat rooms, ticket booths, dressing rooms, projection booths, property storage, make-up rooms, costume and scenery shops and storage, green rooms, multimedia and telecommunications control rooms, etc. Entrance lobbies and other circulation areas outside of the primary assembly room are classified as nonassignable Lobby (W05). A concession stand in an assembly facility is classified as Merchandising (660). Lounge areas that are remote from the assembly area within an assembly facility are classified by the appropriate service code or the Lounge (650) code.
620 Exhibition A room or area used for exhibition of materials, works of art, artifacts, etc., and intended for general use by faculty, students, staff, and the public. Includes both departmental and institution-wide museums, galleries, and similar exhibition areas that are used to display materials and items for viewing by the institutional population and the public. Planetariums used primarily for exhibition are also included in this category. Planetariums used primarily for research should be classified in the Laboratory Facilities (Code 200) series. Displays that are intended only for instructional purposes and not for general exhibitions (e.g., departmental instructional displays of anthropological, botanical, or geological specimens) should be classified as laboratory or laboratory service (see Laboratory Facilities-200 series). Does not include bulletin boards and similar temporary or incidental displays in hallways, student centers, etc. Also does not include collections of educational materials, regardless of form or type (e.g., books, tapes, soils collections), that are study resources (see Stack-420) as opposed to exhibition use.
625 Exhibition Service A space that directly serves an exhibition facility as an extension of the activities in that facility. Includes preparation workrooms, storage rooms, vaults, etc., that serve general exhibition areas (see Exhibition-620). Research areas in museums are classified as Research/Nonclass Laboratory (250) or Research/Nonclass Laboratory Service (255). Service areas for displays that are part of an instructional program are classified as Classroom Service (115) or Laboratory Facilities service areas (see Code 200 series).
630 Food Facility A space used for eating. Includes dining halls, cafeterias, snack bars, restaurants, and similar eating areas, including such areas in residence halls, faculty clubs, etc. This category includes facilities open to students, faculty, staff, or the public at large. The primary distinction of a Food Facility (630) area is the availability of some form of accommodation (seating, counters, tables) for eating or drinking. This is, therefore, an area intended for the actual consumption of food and drink. Vending areas with seating, counters, or tables and sit-down lunch or vending spaces that serve a shop facility are included in this category. Vending areas not provided with seating, counters, or tables are classified as Merchandising (660) or with the appropriate service code if the vending directly supports or is adjacent to a specific space for consuming the products (e.g., a Code 635 vending space serving a Code 630 dining hall).
Lounges (650) with vending machines that are incidental to the primary use of the space (i.e., relaxation) are coded as part of the lounge, if within the space, or as Lounge Service (655) if separate from and directly supporting the main lounge facility (see Lounge-650). Break rooms serving specific office areas are classified as Office Service (315). Eating areas for children in demonstration or day care facilities are classified as primary activity categories within these respective areas (see Demonstration-550 and Day Care-640); staff-only eating or break rooms in these facilities are classified as service areas (see Demonstration Service-555 and Day Care Service-645).
635 Food Facility Service A space that directly serves a food facility as an extension of the activities in that facility. Includes kitchens and other preparation areas, cold storage and freezer refrigeration rooms, dishwashing rooms, food serving areas, cleaning areas, etc. Includes first aid and vending areas directly serving food facilities, or adjacent to an eating area. Does not include any type of food preparation space that does not serve a food facility or eating area (see Food Facility-630). Kitchenettes in residence facilities that do not serve a dining area are classified as Sleep/Study Service (935). Service areas for vending spaces are classified as Merchandising Service (665). Kitchens and food preparation areas in demonstration or day care facilities are classified as service areas for those facilities (see Demonstration Service-555 and Day Care Service-645).
640 Day Care A space used to provide day or night, child or elderly adult care as a nonmedical service to members of the institutional community. Includes all primary activity spaces that provide oversight, supervision, developmental training, and general personal care for assigned children or adults (e.g., play areas, nonstaff eating areas, and child training spaces). This type of facility serves as a central service center for faculty, staff, and students, with members of the community being served as needed. This is not a medical care facility (i.e., medical attention is strictly limited to maintaining prescribed medication schedules and providing first aid). Does not include those support spaces (e.g., storage rooms, closets, and pantries) typically used as service spaces (see Day Care Service-645). This category also does not include demonstration houses, laboratory schools, or other facilities with a primary function of providing practice for postsecondary students as part of the instructional process (see Demonstration-550). Also excluded from this category are those service areas classified as Central Service (750), and Laboratory Facilities (Code 200 series) that directly support instruction (e.g., vocational training programs for parent education and early childhood education).
645 Day Care Service A space that directly serves a primary activity space in a day care facility as an extension of the activities in that space. Includes storage rooms, closets, kitchens or food preparation areas, pantries, private or staff-only eating areas and rest rooms, and other typical service spaces that support a primary activity area. Does not include those spaces (e.g., child training spaces, playrooms—see Day Care-640) where primary day care activities are conducted. Rest rooms designed for child training should be coded Day Care (640). Eating or training areas for children are classified as primary Day Care (640) activity space. Staff office areas should be coded as Office (310).
650 Lounge A space used for rest and relaxation that is not restricted to a specific group of people, unit, or area. A lounge facility is typically equipped with upholstered furniture, draperies, and carpeting, and may include vending machines. This general use lounge differs from an office area or break room lounge (see Office Service-315) by virtue of its public availability. If a space is equipped with more than one or two seats for a seating area and intended for use by people visiting or passing through a building or area, it is coded as a Lounge (650). Such a space may have vending machines even though the primary use of the space is rest, relaxation, or informal socializing, not eating. A lounge facility is distinguished from a Conference Room (350) and a Meeting Room (680), both of which are intended for formal meetings, by its more informal function of rest, relaxation, or casual interaction and its public availability. A lounge area associated with a public rest room is included with the rest room as nonassignable (building service area) space. A space devoted to vending machines without accommodation (seating, counters, or tables) for local food or drink consumption is classified as Merchandising (660). A lounge that directly serves a specific or restricted area is classified by the appropriate corresponding service code (e.g., a lounge serving an assembly facility is classified Assembly Service-615). A lounge differs from a nonassignable lobby in placement, use, and intent. A Lobby (W05) is generally located at a major entrance with openings to either hallways on more than one side or in front of elevator banks; and although it may have seating furniture, it is designed more for passing through (or having standing conversations) than for sitting and relaxing. Separate waiting rooms in other than health care facilities are classified with the appropriate service code according to the room or area they serve. A receptionist room that includes a waiting area should be classified as Office (310). Public waiting areas in health care facilities are coded as Public Waiting (880).
655 Lounge Service A space that directly serves a general use lounge facility. Includes kitchenettes, storage areas, and vending spaces that directly serve a general use Lounge (650). This category does not include kitchenettes, storage rooms, and small vending areas that directly serve other space use types (e.g., a small vending area serving a dining hall eating area should be classified as Food Facility Service-635).
660 Merchandising A space used to sell products or services. Includes product and service sales areas such as bookstores, student supply stores, barber or beauty shops, post offices, campus food stores, walk-away vending machine spaces, and central ticket outlets servicing multiple facilities or activities. Does not include dining rooms, restaurants, snack bars, and similar Food Facilities (630). A vending machine space that directly serves a dining, lounge, or other primary activity area is classified with the appropriate service code; a vending machine area within a general use lounge is included in the Lounge (650) space. Vending areas that include accommodations (seating, counters, or tables) for consuming the products are classified as Food Facility (630). Meeting and conference rooms in hotels or motels are classified as Meeting Rooms (680). Sleeping rooms in hotels or motels are classified in the appropriate category of Residential Facilities (Code 900 series). Cashiers’ desks that serve a specific recreational facility or area are classified as service space for that area (see Codes 670 and 675). Day care centers used for practice within an instructional program are classified as Demonstration (550). Day care centers that are not part of such a program are classified under Day Care (640).
665 Merchandising Service A space that directly serves a merchandising facility as an extension of the activities in that facility. Includes storage rooms and closets, sorting rooms, private rest rooms, and other support spaces if they directly serve a Merchandising (660) facility. Storage rooms, sorting rooms, and private rest rooms that do not serve a merchandising area should be classified using the appropriate service code for the corresponding space use type.
670 Recreation A space used by students, staff, or the public for recreational purposes. Includes exercise and general fitness rooms, billiards rooms, game and arcade rooms, table tennis rooms, chess rooms, card playing rooms, hobby rooms, TV rooms, reading (nonstudy) rooms, and music listening rooms that are used for recreation and amusement and not for instructional purposes. Recreation rooms and areas are used for relaxation, amusement-type activities, whereas athletic facilities are typically used for the more vigorous pursuits within physical education, intercollegiate athletics, and intramural programs that typically require specialized configuration. Does not include gymnasia, basketball courts, weight rooms, racquetball courts, handball courts, squash courts, wrestling rooms, indoor swimming pools, indoor ice rinks, indoor tracks, indoor stadium fields, indoor golf and other areas primarily used for physical education, and intramural or intercollegiate athletic activities (see Code 520). Outdoor athletic and physical education fields, courts, and other nonenclosed areas are also excluded because they are not building space. This category also does not include bowling alleys, dance rooms, or any other activity areas that are primarily used for instruction. Reading or media use rooms that are designed and intended as study spaces are also excluded from this category (see Code 410).
675 Recreation Service A space that directly serves a recreation facility as an extension of the activities in that facility. Includes storage rooms, closets, equipment issue rooms, cashiers’ desks, first aid, and other support areas that directly serve a Recreation (670) facility. Does not include kitchens, snack bars, or other Food Facilities (630) and Food Facility Service (635) areas. Locker rooms, shower rooms, ticket booths, dressing rooms, equipment rooms, and other areas directly serving Athletic or Physical Education (520) facilities are classified as Athletic or Physical Education Service (525) rooms. Central ticket outlets serving multiple facilities or services are classified as Merchandising (660).
680 Meeting Room A room that is used by the institution or the public for a variety of nonclass meetings. Description: The key concept here is public availability. Conference Rooms (350) are often confused with meeting spaces because they are both primarily used for nonclass meetings. However, conference spaces are restricted service components of an office complex or used by office occupants of a specific area and are generally limited to staff meetings or other departmental nonclass activities. Although it may be assigned to a specific organizational unit, a meeting space is more available and open to study groups, boards, governing groups, community groups, various student groups, nonemployees of the institution, and various combinations of institutional and community members. Meeting spaces in institutional hotels or motels and other for-fee meeting spaces are included in this category.
Meeting spaces may be configured like classrooms (i.e., with participant focus to the front of the room), or may be equipped with a variety of furniture types (e.g., tables and chairs, lounge-type furniture, tablet armchairs, or a large table) in various combinations and arrangements.
Spaces serving an office complex and used primarily for staff meetings are classified as Conference Room (350). Seminar and lecture rooms used primarily for scheduled classes are classified as Classroom (110). Spaces designed and equipped for the assembly of many persons for such events as dramatic, musical or devotional activities, etc., should be classified as Assembly (610).
685 Meeting Room Service A space that serves a meeting space as an extension of the activities in that space. Includes kitchenettes, multimedia storage and control rooms, furniture storage rooms, and other support spaces that directly serve a meeting space. Does not include kitchenettes, storage rooms, and other support areas that serve a Conference Room (350) or an Assembly (610) facility.

700: Support Facilities

 

 

Code# Code Name Definition  Description Limitations
710 Central Computer or Telecommunications A space used as a data or telecommunications center with applications that are broad enough to serve the overall administrative or academic primary equipment needs of a central group of users, department, college, school, or entire institution. A Central Computer or Telecommunications room or a Secured Compartmented Information Facility (SCIF) may be one of a group of spaces that constitute a center for delivering data processing or telecommunications services to various levels of user groups. Although the ongoing primary activity of this category is tied more closely to equipment than human activity, these areas require technical support staff, and physical access may be restricted to these personnel. These central equipment spaces appear most frequently at the campus-wide and large organizational unit levels and are generally subject to environmental and security controls and procedures limiting users to remote access. Includes central rooms housing a computer or computers (e.g., large mainframe, server farms, etc.), peripheral input (e.g., data entry terminals, tape or disk drives, data reading equipment, monitors, etc.), and output devices (e.g., printers, output tape or disk drives, etc.). This category also includes spaces in a central computer complex that are primarily or exclusively dedicated to data or program code entry or job submissions through one or more terminals.
Computer-based telecommunications equipment rooms, ranging from micro-driven LAN (local area) to the larger PBX (private branch) network centers and hubs, including central spaces housing satellite signal reception or transmission equipment, should be assigned the 710 code. This equipment may be dedicated to data, audio or telephone, video, or any combination of these electronic transmissions.
Does not include Office (310) space assigned to programmers, analysts, engineers, data entry personnel, and other technical staff, even though these spaces usually contain an access terminal. Also does not include instructional laboratories and study spaces equipped with personal computers or terminals (see Class Laboratory-210, Open Laboratory-220, Study Room-410), or Offices (310) with data processing equipment used as office tools. Personal computer or terminal work spaces and printer rooms that serve an office area should be coded Office Service (315). Small closet areas housing telecommunications equipment and wiring that are not used by technical or support staff on a regular basis (i.e., repair or modification only) should be classified as nonassignable mechanical space (see Utility/Mechanical Space-Y04).
715 Central Computer or Telecommunications Service A space that directly serves a central computer or telecommunications facility as an extension of the activities in that facility. Includes paper and forms storage, off-line tape and disk storage, separate control or console rooms or booths, tool and parts rooms, bursting and decollating rooms, areas used to store only inactive support equipment (e.g., multiplexers, modems, spoolers, etc.), and separate areas used for delivering tapes or picking up printouts. Also includes the repair and assembly rooms that directly serve the central computer or telecommunications facility. Does not include Office (310) areas for personnel (technicians, engineers, analysts, programmers) assigned to the central computer facility, primary equipment (computer, I/O device) rooms (see Central Computer or Telecommunications-710), and office areas containing data processing or networking office service equipment or materials (see Office-310, Office Service-315). Also does not include spaces directly supporting study spaces (see Study Service-455) or laboratories (see Code 200 series) that contain special computer equipment used for study, instruction, or research. A nonoffice workroom containing a remote printer or data/job entry terminal that is part of an office area, and not the central computer facility, should be coded Office Service (315). A printer room serving a general purpose terminal room in a dormitory should be classified as Study Service (455).
720 Shop A space used for the manufacture, repair, or maintenance of products or equipment. Includes carpenter, plumbing, HVAC, electrical, and painting shops, and similar physical plant maintenance facilities. This category also includes centralized shops for construction or repair of research or instructional equipment, and repair and maintenance of multimedia equipment and devices. Special purpose shops (e.g., glass blowing, machining) supporting multiple spaces for scientific instruction and research are included in this category. Does not include instructional shops (i.e., industrial arts or vocational technical shops used for instruction), which should be classified as Laboratory Facilities (200 series). Facilities used for producing and distributing multimedia materials and signals are classified as Media Production (530). Architectural and engineering drafting rooms serving the facilities management operation are classified as Office (310). Blueprint storage rooms are classified as Office Service (315). Small, incidental equipment repair, assembly, or cleaning rooms that directly serve an adjacent or nearby primary activity room should be classified according to the appropriate corresponding service code. This category also does not include areas used for the repair and maintenance of institution-owned vehicles (see Vehicle Storage Service-745) or spaces directly serving media production or distribution areas (see Media Production Service-535). Also excludes costume and scene shops serving theater areas (see Assembly Service-615). Greenhouses used for campus physical maintenance or improvements should be coded 580.
725 Shop Service A space that directly serves a shop facility as an extension of the activities in that facility. Includes tool storage rooms, materials storage rooms, and similar equipment or material supply or storage rooms. Locker, shower, first aid, and similar nonpublic areas that serve the shop facility should be included. Does not include service areas for Class Laboratories (210) or Research/Nonclass Laboratories (250). Also does not include vehicular repair facilities (i.e., garages) classified as Vehicle Storage Service (745). Blueprint storage rooms should be classified as Office Service (315). Spaces directly serving media production or distribution facilities are coded Media Production Service (535). Sit-down lunch or vending spaces that serve a shop facility are classified Food Facility (630).
730 Central Storage A space or building that is used to store equipment or materials and that serves multiple space use categories, organizational units, or buildings. The concept of central or general is key to applying this code correctly. The vast majority of storage spaces on a campus are service rooms that directly support a primary activity room or room group; for example, a paper storage room (see Office Service-315) can serve several Offices (310) in an area. Service storage rooms are somewhat closer to the areas they serve and are used more than occasionally. Central storage areas include areas commonly called warehouses, surplus storage, central campus supply or storage, and inactive storage. A storage space used to store bulk janitorial supplies would be included in this category. It also includes storage rooms in a building or building area that serve multiple space use categories and that are used for general or surplus (e.g., furniture, equipment) collection or storage. The 730 code can usually be used for all assignable storage areas that do not qualify as service spaces. Does not include a storage space directly serving a primary space use category or group of such spaces (i.e., a space that is clearly a service space). Also, this category does not include the nonassignable Custodial Supply Closet (X01) used to store small quantities of janitorial supplies, or any other category codes within the nonassignable Circulation Areas (WWW), Building Service Areas (XXX), or Mechanical Areas (YYY). Offices within warehouses or other central storage buildings are coded as Office (310). Centralized food stores and laundries are classified Central Service (750). Compact storage facilities for library materials are excluded from this category unless they are incorporated into a larger central storage facility serving multiple units and functions.
735 Central Storage Service A space that directly serves a central storage facility as an extension of the activities in that facility. Central storage service spaces are typically limited to support rooms associated with the transporting of materials in and out of large central storage facilities and warehouses. Storage spaces for hand trucks and other moving equipment, shelving storage, and other spaces supporting the central storage function are included. Only those spaces directly supporting the (usually) larger Central Storage (730) area should be classified with this code.
740 Vehicle Storage A space or structure that is used to house or store vehicles. Includes structures, buildings, and spaces generally called parking decks, garages, boathouses, and airplane hangars. The definition of “vehicle” is broadly interpreted here to include forklifts, moving equipment, lawn equipment, and other powered transport devices or equipment, as well as automobiles and trucks. This category does not include unroofed surface parking lots. It also does not include structures that house or store farm vehicles and implements (see Code 560). (See Parking Structure, section 3.2.10, for suggested classification of parking structures.)
745 Vehicle Storage Service A space that directly serves a vehicle storage facility as an extension of the activities in that facility. Includes any areas or rooms directly serving a vehicle storage facility, such as storage rooms and areas used for maintenance and repair of automotive equipment, boats, airplanes, and other vehicles as defined in Vehicle Storage (740). Does not include shops as defined in Shop (720) (e.g., carpenter, plumbing, electrical, painting, etc.). Offices within a Vehicle Storage facility should be classified as Office (310).
750 Central Service A room or area that is used for the processing, preparation, testing, or delivery of a complex-central or campus-wide support service. The central service delivery may be provided by special equipment, human activity, the special availability of space, or any combination of these elements. Includes centralized food stores and laundries that typically serve the occupants or activities of more than one building. Also includes central facilities for printing and duplicating services, central mail facilities, central shipping and receiving areas, and central environmental testing or monitoring facilities, if they serve the occupants and activities of more than one building. Institutions may wish to differentiate individual central services through the use of additional codes in this series. Most of these centralized areas have a campus-wide service scope. Does not include those spaces providing the above listed functions if they support other primary activity spaces in the same building. For example, a food storage area in a cafeteria should be coded as Food Facility Service (635); a laundry room in a residence hall should be coded as Sleep/Study Service (935); a copy room or mail room in an office area is coded Office Service (315). Media production or distribution facilities are coded separately as Media Production (530); and computer-based data processing and telecommunications equipment centers are coded separately as Central Computer or Telecommunications (710). Facilities used for the manufacture, repair, or maintenance of products or equipment should be coded Shop (720). Central Storage (730) and Vehicle Storage (740) facilities also have separate codes.
755 Central Service Support A space that directly serves a central service facility as an extension of the activities in that facility. Central Service Support spaces are typically limited to extension storage rooms for supplies, parts, and moving or nonactive equipment, and adjacent, directly supporting repair and maintenance areas. Offices within a central service area or complex should be coded Office (310). Centralized physical plant repair and maintenance facilities that do not directly support a Central Service (750) facility should be coded Shop (720).
760 Hazardous Materials Storage A centralized facility used for the storage of materials planned for future use or distribution that are considered hazardous by the physical, chemical, biological, or radioactive nature of the materials. Hazardous materials include those materials that are flammable, chemically aggressive (e.g., acids or bases), chemically unstable, biologically toxic, or radioactive. These materials are “new” in nature, in that they had been acquired for specific planned use and are not remnants or “leftovers” from other work activities. This category of space is separate from hazardous waste storage (770). Does not include centralized storage of hazardous waste materials (see Hazardous Waste Storage-770); small satellite storage areas located around the institution; satellite accumulation areas located near or adjacent to instructional, research, or process facilities; or a dedicated Unit Storage (see Codes 215, 225, 255, 770, 775, 780).
770 Hazardous Waste Storage A centralized storage facility used for the treatment and/or disposal of hazardous or toxic waste materials as defined, classified, and controlled under government environmental regulations. This includes facilities specifically devoted to the storage, treatment, and/or disposal of toxic or hazardous waste. Hazardous or toxic waste materials are those materials remaining in excess from any particular process or procedure and so represent waste, the disposal of which is regulated by government environmental regulations. Does not include centralized storage of hazardous materials (see Hazardous Materials Storage-760); small area satellite storage areas located around the institution; satellite accumulation areas located near or adjacent to instructional, research, or process facilities; or dedicated Unit Storage (see Codes 215, 225, 255, 760, 775, 780).
775 Hazardous Waste Service Small storage areas distributed throughout the institution used for temporary storage of hazardous or toxic waste materials as defined, classified, and controlled under government environmental regulations. Hazardous waste materials services provides for distributed collection areas located in (close) proximity to hazardous waste generators for the temporary storage of hazardous waste materials until relocated to the central hazardous waste storage location, or until collected for final disposal. This includes satellite accumulation areas located near or adjacent to instructional, research, or process facilities. Does not include centralized storage of hazardous materials (see Hazardous Materials Storage-760); centralized storage of hazardous waste materials (see Hazardous Waste Storage-770); or dedicated Unit Storage (780) (see Codes 215, 225, 255, 760, 770, 780).
780 Unit Storage A dedicated storage area or location under the direct control and management of a specific institutional division, department, office, business unit, or similar organizational unit. A dedicated storage unit or location typically remote from the controlling unit’s work space and under its direct control and management for the purpose of storing materials and equipment related to and in support of the unit’s particular program and activities. This category of space is different from hazardous materials storage (760) or hazardous waste storage (770). Does not include centralized storage of hazardous materials (see Hazardous Materials Storage-760); centralized storage of hazardous waste materials (see Hazardous Waste Storage-770); small area satellite storage areas located around the institution; or satellite accumulation areas located near or adjacent to instructional, research, or process facilities (see Codes 215, 225, 255, 760, 770, 775).

800: Healthcare Facilities

 

Code# Code Name Definition  Description Limitations
810 Patient Bedroom A room equipped with one or more beds and used for patient care. This category includes general nursing care, acute care, semi convalescent and rehabilitative adult or pediatric bedrooms, intensive care units, progressive coronary care units, emergency bed care units, observation units, infant care nurseries, incubator units, wards, etc. Connected clothes closets may be aggregated with Patient Bedroom (810) space or classified separately as Patient Bedroom Service (815).
Stalls or cage rooms for animal patients are also included, although specific bedding areas may not be provided. Veterinary facility areas commonly called veterinary quarters, small or large animal ward, equine stall, bovine stall, etc., are included in this category.
Student residence quarters should be classified with the Residential Facilities (Code 900 series) codes. Staff on-call spaces for resting and sleeping are coded as Staff On-Call Facility (890).
Does not include nonpatient animal shelters used for farm animals (see Field Building-560) or nonveterinary school laboratory animals (see Animal Facilities-570).
815 Patient Bedroom Service A room that directly serves one or more patient bedrooms as an extension of the activities in those spaces. Included are linen closets, patient lounges, children’s play rooms, and any other service areas that are used primarily by patients rather than staff. Also includes small anterooms and closets connected to the patient bedrooms if these areas are not aggregated with the Patient Bedroom (810) space.
Veterinary facility areas commonly called ward storage and groom spaces should be classified within this category.
Excludes the small, connected clothes closets in patient bedrooms, which are included in the Patient Bedroom (810) space. Support areas that do not directly serve a patient bedroom or patient bedroom ward should be classified with the service code corresponding to the primary activity area being served. Also not included are the utility, storage, medication preparation, and other work rooms that serve a nurse station (see Nurse Station Service-835).
Does not include feed storage or mixing rooms, cage washing areas, surgery, casting, or instrument rooms that serve a laboratory animal quarters facility (see Animal Facilities Service-575). Veterinary institution feed storage and food preparation rooms are classified as Nurse Station Service (835).
820 Patient Bath A room containing patient bath and toilet facilities. Included in this category are toilet and bath facilities adjoining or in proximity to patient bedrooms. These rooms may contain various configurations of toilet, tub, shower, or commode facilities; individual types of Patient Bath (820) may be distinguished through the application of extension codes.
Animal cleaning rooms in veterinary schools are included in this classification unless the cleaning rooms are specifically used for surgery preparation (see Surgery Service-845).
Public rest rooms and private rest rooms serving areas other than patient bedrooms (e.g., Office Service-315, Nurse Station Service-835) are excluded. Special tub rooms used by nursing staff for cleaning patients are classified Nurse Station Service (835).
Animal groom rooms should be coded 815.
830 Nurse Station A room or area used by nurses or other patient care staff who are supervising or administering health care services. This is the primary workstation area used by nurses and other patient care staff; these personnel are typically assigned to a specific ward of the facility. Includes ward reception and admissions desks and records or charting work areas. Spaces that are used as Offices (310) should be so classified.
835 Nurse Station Service A space that directly serves one or more nurse station spaces as an extension of the activities in those spaces. Includes nurse lounges or break rooms, locker rooms, private staff rest rooms, utility rooms, storage (e.g., medications, supplies, etc.), formula and medication preparation areas, equipment sterilization, and other work rooms directly serving the nurse station. Also includes special tub rooms, nourishment rooms, and separate storage rooms for records and charts.
Animal or poultry maintenance service rooms in veterinary institutions, including tack rooms, horseshoeing rooms, food preparation, and feed storage rooms, are also included in this category.
Spaces used as Offices (310) should be so classified. Pharmacy and other central supply areas are classified as Central Supplies (870). Areas directly serving patient bedrooms are coded Patient Bedroom Service (815). Additional codes may be used to distinguish clean and soiled utility rooms, medication and nourishment rooms, etc., as needed.
840 Surgery A room used for surgery. Included in this category are major and minor surgery rooms, delivery rooms, and special procedures operating rooms (e.g., OB-GYN, ophthalmic operating rooms). These spaces are typically equipped with operating room tables, sterile lights, anesthesia machines, and various types of monitoring equipment. Institutions may wish to distinguish specific types of surgery or operating rooms through extension coding.
Also includes rooms in veterinary facilities typically referred to as large animal surgery, small animal (includes poultry) surgery, bovine surgery, bull surgery, etc.
Does not include the various surgery support spaces that are used as a direct extension of surgery activities (see Surgery Service-845). Also does not include spaces used for the minor invasive procedures (e.g., blood withdrawal, cardiac catheterization) of the diagnostic examination process (see Treatment/Examination Clinic-850).
845 Surgery Service A space that directly serves a surgery room as an extension of the activities in that facility. Included are recovery rooms, labor rooms, special support equipment rooms (e.g., anesthesia, heart, lung, x-ray, etc.), dictation booths, scrub-up rooms, gown rooms, locker rooms, instrument cleanup and storage rooms, sterile supply storage rooms, patient (surgery preparation) cleaning rooms, monitor rooms, gas and gurney storage areas, postoperative and operating room repair rooms, and clean and dirty utility areas, if these spaces directly serve the surgery facility.
Animal holding rooms are also included here if they directly serve a veterinary surgery room.
Storage and other support spaces that do not directly serve a Surgery (840) facility should be classified with the appropriate service space category. Rooms used for the direct implementation of surgical procedures are classified Surgery (840).
850 Treatment/Examination Clinic A space used for examinations, diagnosis, consultation, or treatment. Included are rooms used for radiology, fluoroscopy, angiography, physical and occupational therapy, dialysis, body (e.g., CAT, MRI, ultrasound) scanning, cardiac catheterization, pulmonary function and vascular testing, EEG, ECG, EMC, EMR, linear acceleration, dental examination, treatment, speech, hearing, and other similar activities. Also includes combined doctor’s office and treatment/examination clinic rooms.
In veterinary institutions, rooms commonly called isolation treatment, small or large animal treatment, small or large animal x-ray, etc., are included.
Does not include rooms used for the more radically invasive treatment procedures of surgery (see Surgery-840). Treatment/Examination Clinic (850) diagnosis differs from Diagnostic Service Laboratory (860) testing and diagnosis in that the former requires the presence of the patient.
855 Treatment/Examination Clinic Service A space that directly serves a Treatment/Examination Clinic room as an extension of the activities in those spaces. Included are dressing rooms, x-ray and film reading or viewing rooms, film processing rooms, dark rooms, work preparation areas, equipment and supply storage areas, soundproof rooms, patient dressing rooms, and clean and dirty utility rooms if these areas directly serve the primary activity treatment/examination clinic facility.
Also includes spaces in veterinary institutions commonly called animal holding pens, or other similar services if these areas serve a treatment/examination clinic area.
Does not include service areas for diagnostic service laboratories (see Diagnostic Service Laboratory-860, Diagnostic Service Laboratory Support-865), which typically support the entire health care facility. Primary activity rooms that are used to deliver therapeutic and diagnostic treatment should be coded Treatment/Examination Clinic (850). Treatment, examination, or clinic waiting rooms are classified as Public Waiting (880) facilities.
860 Diagnostic Service Laboratory A space used to provide diagnostic support services to an entire health care facility. Includes pathology, pharmacy, autopsy, isotope rooms or labs, etc., providing such services as hematology, chemistry tissue, bacteriology, serology, blood bank, and basal metabolism.
Also includes areas commonly termed “animal necropsy rooms” in veterinary institutions.
Laboratories used primarily for instructional purposes should be classified with the Laboratory Facilities (Code 200 series). Rooms used for diagnostic and therapeutic examination or treatment of patients should be classified as Treatment/Examination Clinic (850) facilities.
865 Diagnostic Service Laboratory Support A space that directly serves a diagnostic service laboratory as an extension of the activities in that facility. Included are cadaver storage rooms, morgues, autoclave and centrifuge rooms, warm and cold rooms, lockers, scrub-up and gown rooms, special processing rooms, and supply and storage areas that directly serve one or more diagnostic service laboratories.
Also includes carcass refrigerators and other areas with the above service functions in veterinary institutions.
Does not include storage areas, dressing rooms, work preparation rooms, and other areas that support a patient Treatment/Examination Clinic (850) room.
870 Central Supplies A room used centrally to store health care supplies in a health care facility. This classification, which serves a central storage or supply function similar to the Central Storage (730) classification, applies only to health care materials and supplies in a health care facility. Storage is relatively inactive in comparison to (usually smaller) standard service rooms. Included are pharmacy supply and storage rooms, dispensary areas, and central linen storage rooms. Additional codes may be used by institutions that wish to differentiate among the specific materials being stored. Does not include central storage areas for materials or equipment that are not directly health care related (e.g., furniture, office equipment); such areas should be classified as Central Storage (730). Linen closets that serve nurse stations and other limited scope service areas should be classified with the appropriate service code. Also excluded are multipurpose supply or storage facilities that serve more campus units than just the health care facility.
880 Public Waiting A space used by the public to await admission, treatment, or information within a health care facility. Included are lobby areas that are specifically configured and furnished for public waiting; physical or phantom boundaries should be assigned, as needed, to define nonassignable areas of entrance lobbies that simply serve a circulation function. Also includes patient waiting rooms, visiting areas, viewing rooms, and ward day rooms. Open lounges (see Lounge-650) and other service room lounges (e.g., patient lounge—see Patient Bedroom Service-815) should be classified appropriately. Only areas specifically assigned to public waiting for admission, treatment, or information should be classified with this code.
890 Staff On-Call Facility A room or quarters used by health care staff to rest or sleep while on call to assigned duties within a health care facility. Includes areas or rooms used by doctors, nurses, emergency medical technicians, night care crews, etc., to rest or sleep while on call to specific duties within the facility. Staff on-call rooms or quarters differ from open and service area lounges (see Lounge-650) in that specific provisions are made for sleeping, and use is restricted to staff who typically work a long shift. Bedrooms for patients should be coded as Patient Bedroom (810); student residence quarters should be classified with the Residential Facilities (900 series) codes.
895 Staff On-Call Facility Service A space that directly serves as a staff on-call room as an extension of the activities in that facility. Includes kitchens, baths, laundry rooms, lounges, closets, storage rooms, and other service areas that directly serve the on-call quarters. Does not include storage and other support spaces that serve Patient Bedrooms (815). Also excluded are Central Supply areas (870).

900: Residential Facilities

 

 

Code# Code Name Definition  Description Limitations
910 Sleep/Study Without Toilet or Bath A residential room for one or more individuals typically furnished with bed(s), wardrobe(s), closet(s), desk(s), and chair(s), without an internally connected bath or toilet. Includes single or multiple sleep/study rooms. A sleep/study facility may be a room for combined sleep/study, a room exclusively for sleeping, or a room for living and study. Connected closets are considered part of the room. Study rooms for general use, available and open to the dormitory residents at large, and not part of bedroom or sleeping room suites, should be classified as Study Space (410). Residential quarters equipped with internal cooking facilities are coded Apartment (950). Separate food preparation rooms serving sleep/study areas, including small kitchens used by the occupants, are coded Sleep/Study Service (935) unless there is an accompanying eating area (see Food Facility-630) that the food preparation area directly serves. The appropriate service code of Food Facility Service (635) would then be applied.
919 Toilet or Bath A toilet or bathroom intended only for the occupants of the residential facilities, rather than for the public. Includes common or shared bathroom facilities that may consist of full or half bath, shower, or toilet and shower combinations, used by the residents and accessible from a corridor or other general circulation area. Does not include public rest rooms. Bathrooms internal to a Sleep/Study With Toilet or Bath (920), Apartment (950), or House (970) are included in those respective categories. Private rest room areas that serve offices are Office Service (315).
920 Sleep/Study With Toilet or Bath A residential room for one or more individuals typically furnished with bed(s), wardrobe(s), closet(s), desk(s), and chair(s), with an internally connected bath or toilet. Includes single or multiple sleep/study rooms with bath facilities internal to the suite and not separately classified Toilet or Bath (919). A sleep/study facility with toilet or bath may be a room for combined sleep/study, a room exclusively for sleeping, or a room for living and study, and includes connected closets. A sleep/study with toilet or bath facility, by definition, has a private toilet or bath that is accessible without having to go out to a hallway or other general circulation area. Suites may have a study and living room that is private to the residents of the suite area. These areas are included as part of the Sleep/Study With Toilet or Bath (920) space. Study spaces for general use, available and open to the dormitory residents at large, and not part of bedroom or sleeping room suites, should be classified as Study Rooms (410). Residential quarters equipped with cooking facilities are coded as Apartment (950). Sleep/Study Rooms Without Toilet or Bath (910) and their corresponding external Toilet or Bath (919) rooms are coded separately.
935 Sleep/Study Service A room that directly serves the occupants of sleep/study rooms. This is the service code for the Sleep/Study Rooms Without Toilet or Bath (910) and Sleep/Study With Toilet or Bath (920) residential facility categories. Includes mail rooms, laundry and pressing rooms, linen closets, housekeeping rooms, serving rooms, trunk storage rooms, and telephone rooms that serve the occupants of sleep/study facilities. Kitchen or food preparation spaces that serve sleeping areas and do not serve an accompanying eating or dining area (see Food Facility-630) are also classified as Sleep/Study Service (935). Does not include Offices (310), Lounges (650), Study Rooms (410), eating or dining areas (see Food Facility-630), toilet/bath areas for occupants of Sleep/Study rooms (see Toilet or Bath-919), Recreation (670) areas, or Meeting Rooms (680) in any residential facility, including institutionally controlled hotels or motels.
950 Apartment A complete living unit, with private cooking facilities, that is not a separate structure. This is the basic module or group of rooms designed as a complete housekeeping unit (i.e., it contains bedroom(s), living room(s), kitchen, and rest room facilities). It is not intended that individual rooms be specifically identified within the apartment, but only that the total interior space be included. Includes apartments provided for faculty, staff, students, or visiting guests. Apartments need not be located in a residential building. Duplex units or townhouses should be classified as Apartments (950) because they are not separate, freestanding structures. Does not include single, freestanding structures (see House-970) or any residential units that do not contain private cooking facilities such as Sleep/Study Rooms Without Toilet or Bath (910) and Sleep/Study With Toilet or Bath (920).
955 Apartment Service A room or area that directly serves an apartment or group of apartments as an extension of the activities in that facility. Includes laundry rooms, mail rooms, linen closets, maintenance, housekeeping or security rooms, trunk storage rooms, telephone rooms, and weight or exercise rooms that serve apartment facilities. Apartment service facilities may be located in a separate building that serves an apartment complex. Service rooms (laundry, storage, etc.) that are internal to an apartment unit are included in the Apartment (950) space. Does not include service rooms (laundry, mail, trunk, etc.) that directly serve residential facilities that have no internal cooking facilities such as Sleep/Study Rooms Without Toilet or Bath (910) or Sleep/Study With Toilet or Bath (920). This category also excludes service rooms within a separate, freestanding residential unit (see House-970).
970 House A complete living unit, with private cooking facilities, that is a separate structure. Should include fraternity and sorority houses only if owned or controlled by the institution. This is the basic module or group of rooms designed as a complete housekeeping unit (i.e., it contains bedroom(s), living room(s), kitchen, and toilet facilities). It is not intended that individual rooms be specifically identified within the structure, but only that the total interior area be accounted for. Includes houses provided for faculty, staff, or students. Should include fraternity and sorority houses only if owned by the institution. Houses and other residential properties that are owned or controlled by an institution as commercial investments, and that do not serve the institution’s primary missions, are often excluded from the formally coded facilities inventory. Does not include complete living units that are part of a larger structure (see Apartment-950). Houses used as office areas should be classified with the Office Facilities (300 series) codes.

W: Circulation Areas

 

Code# Code Name Definition  Description Limitations
W01 Bridge/Tunnel A covered and walled connecting passageway for people to pass over or under the ground to gain access to another facility.   Ground-level covered passageways, walled or not, are coded as Public Corridors (W06). Any portion of the floor area of covered and walled bridges or tunnels used exclusively for housing utility services such as gas, steam, or water lines, should not be included in a space inventory as they are considered infrastructure and should be dealt with accordingly.
W02 Elevator The structural shaft built to accommodate one or more elevator cabs. The entire cross-sectional shaft area is to be inventoried at each floor level through which it passes.   Individual elevator cabs are considered as fixed equipment within the shaft space; thus, their area is not added to the space inventory.
W03 Escalator A moving passageway that carries passengers from one floor level to another, or along a level path over some distance. For a ramped escalator, the floor area taken by the entire length of each escalator at the lowest level is recorded at that floor level. The area of each floor penetrated by that escalator is inventoried on each of those floors.   The escalator equipment itself is considered as fixed equipment and may be inventoried as a fixed asset. The overall dimensions of that equipment may be smaller than the floor area penetration inventoried for a space inventory.
W04 Loading Dock A covered area of a platform used to load or off-load goods or materials that are to be transported elsewhere within a reasonable amount of time such that the platform is not considered as a storage location. Only the length and width of the platform’s covered area is to be included in the inventory. If the platform is internal to the building line, that area of the platform covered by the floor immediately above is to be included in the inventory.   Any part of the platform area not covered is excluded from the building’s gross, assignable, and nonassignable areas. Any area of a loading dock that is used for central storage of nonhazardous materials should be regarded as assignable area and coded as Central Storage (730).
W05 Lobby A circulation area used to transition from the floor’s external entrance to internal circulation space, to pass from one corridor to another, or to move to a different level such as a lobby area outside an elevator bank. Although a Lobby may have some limited seating furniture, it is designed more for passing through (or having standing conversations) than for sitting and relaxing.   A Lobby differs from an assignable Lounge (650) in furniture placement, use, and intent.
W06 Public Corridor A covered passageway or ramped area available to the general public, whether walled or not, to transport people or things from one location to another. The use of phantom walls is recommended to identify portions of passageways on the same floor level that may represent differing purposes, e.g., a main corridor versus a side corridor, or differing maintenance needs, e.g., terrazzo flooring versus carpeted flooring.   Restricted access private circulation aisles or ramped areas used only for circulation within an organizational unit’s suite of rooms, auditoria, or other working areas should not be included. In these cases, they may fall within the service subcategories of those space use categories, or earn a separate service subcategory of “Private Circulation,” for example (see Description under 315 Office Service, p. 53).
W07 Stairway The covered internal or external space dedicated to provide nonmechanically assisted passage from one floor level to another. In an enclosed stairway, the cross-sectional area of the stairwell is inventoried at each floor through which it passes. In an unenclosed stairway, only that area beneath the stairway structure that is not accessible or has less than a 3-foot ceiling height is included.   In stairways that pass through floor openings larger than themselves, the open area around the stairway’s floor penetration is not counted as either gross area or usable area. In an unenclosed stairway, that area beneath the stairway structure that is accessible and has a 3-foot ceiling height or greater should be included as both gross area and usable area in the inventory.
W08 Vestibule A small area or room between doors leading into a building or into a room within a building.  Include such areas as the enclosed entrance to a building which consists of two sets of doors or an area which serves as an entrance to another area.  Do not include Lobby(ies) or Hall(s) in this category of space. 
W09 Ramp An inclined passageway or corridor of slope (usually no greater than 1:12) for use by individuals in wheelchairs.   Includes only those spaces that are clearly part of a buildings internal circulation plan or are required by handicapped accessibility standards to provide barrier-free access to a space. 

X: Building Service Areas

 

Code# Code Name Definition  Description Limitations
X01 Custodial Supply Closet / Janitor Room A small area or closet that houses limited quantities of custodial supplies for daily use by custodial staff.
OR
A space dedicated for use by janitorial staff. It may include a clothes changing area, clothes lockers, shower facility, a small eating and relaxing space, a desk for completing paperwork, a sink room for wet mop activities, or a temporary trash collection area for nonhazardous waste materials. 
  Similar areas in health care facilities should be coded as Treatment/Examination Clinic Service (855).
X02 Trash Room A space for the temporary storage of nonhazardous waste awaiting disposal or removal.   Rooms or spaces that house hazardous waste should be coded as either Hazardous Waste Storage (770) or Hazardous Waste Services (775).
X03 Public Restroom  All gender-neutral private toilet facilities Include all gender-neutral private toilet facilities open to the general public or for general use of the building occupants. Similar areas that by nature of their location or their door locks are reserved for certain staff within the building should be coded as Office Service (315). The use of the subcategory Private Rest Room within the Office Service code is an option to further delineate these types of spaces.
X04 Public Restroom Men's Includes all toilet facilities, whether locked or not, that are made available for general public use. Accompanying rest areas that are contiguous to a public rest room are also included as part of the toilet facility’s area.   Similar areas that by nature of their location or their door locks are reserved for certain staff within the building should be coded as Office Service (315). The use of the subcategory Private Rest Room within the Office Service code is an option to further delineate these types of spaces.
X05 Public Restroom Women's Includes all toilet facilities, whether locked or not, that are made available for general public use. Accompanying rest areas that are contiguous to a public rest room are also included as part of the toilet facility’s area.   Similar areas that by nature of their location or their door locks are reserved for certain staff within the building should be coded as Office Service (315). The use of the subcategory Private Rest Room within the Office Service code is an option to further delineate these types of spaces
X06 Public Shower A room containing bathroom fixtures.  Included in this category are rooms generally referred to as shower rooms, washrooms, toilet rooms, etc.   
X07 Lactation Room A private room where a breastfeeding woman can use a breast pump in private one or more times a day Include in this category rooms and prorated portions of rooms designated for breastfeeding women to express milk mechanically or manually, in accordance with ORS
653.077.
 

Y: Mechanical Areas

 

Code# Code Name Definition  Description Limitations
Y01 Central Utility Plant A facility that primarily houses central utility production and/or distribution to more than one facility on campus. These include such facilities as steam plants, cogeneration facilities, and electrical distribution facilities.   Conventional space use types such as Offices (310), Office Service (315), Conference Rooms (350), and the like are designated as such, even though they are located in a central utility plant.
Y02 Fuel Room A room or area within a building in which fuel for the heating/cooling of the building is stored.   Underground tanks adjacent to the building that do not fulfill the definition of a building should be treated as infrastructure.
Y03 Shaft Included are accessible or nonaccessible shaft spaces available to house utility pipes and cables, or to distribute air within or to the exterior of a building. The cross-sectional area of every shaft is to be inventoried at each floor level through which it passes.   Shafts that house elevator cabs are to be coded as Elevator (W02).
Y04 Utility/Mechanical Space Included are covered and walled areas that house one or more utility and/or mechanical functions for the building. These areas range from large rooms co-located on a “mechanical” floor or basement area to small closet spaces distributed throughout the building. Such areas, while generally located within the exterior walls of a building or as an accessible roof structure, may be separately housed adjacent to the structure that they serve. They include such areas sometimes referred to as electrical, meter, network, or telecommunication spaces. Some may prefer to identify these specific spaces separately and may do so by adding them as subcategories of this space use.   Air inflow or outflow shafts within or immediately adjacent to the building, with a minimum ceiling height of 3 feet, fall under the nonassignable space use Shaft (Y03) and must be included in both gross area and nonassignable area calculations.
Y05 Elevator Machinery That portion of a building designed to house elevator equipment. Include all rooms that contain electrical and mechanical equipment for the normal operation of elevators Do not include shafts, pits, or other inaccessible spaces.

Functional Space Use Codes

Functional Space Use Codes represents the function or activity that occurs in this space.  These Codes are vital in determining indirect cost recovery of Facilities and Administrative (F&A) costs associated with sponsored agreements. Accurately tracking and maintaining costs associated with building and equipment depreciation and building O&M Costs is a mandatory requirement by the Office of Management and Budget. 

The Functional Space Use Codes are utilized for cost financial accounting purposes.  These codes allow data to link space allocations to financial data or to institutional missions (e.g., the proportion of space used for public service) or to analyze and compare space allocations across institutions according to commonly used functional categories.  NOTE:  As part of the recent aglignment to FICM Standards, the "use codes" category used previously has been renamed to Functional Space Use Codes.

 

 

AiM Code DESCRIPTION DEFINITION SUBCATEGORY
1.0 Instruction This category includes all activities that are part of an institution’s instructional program. Included are credit and noncredit courses for academic, vocational, and technical instruction; remedial and tutorial instruction; regular, special, and extension sessions; and community education. Includes departmental research and sponsored instruction.
  • All teaching and training (except research training)
  • Vocational teaching
  • Technical teaching
  • Departmental research
  • Sponsored instruction and training
2.0 Organized/Sponsored Research This category should include all activities specifically organized and separately budgeted to produce research outcomes, whether commissioned by an agency external to the institution or separately by an organizational unit within the institution.
  • Sponsored research
  • Research training
  • University research
3.0 Other Sponsored Activities  
  • Sponsored health service
  • Sponsored community service programs
4.1 Libraries Libraries—Official and organized central and branch libraries.
  • Official and organized central and branch libraries.
4.2 Departmental Administration Departmental Administration—Includes all activities directly supporting Deans and Department Chairs.
  • Includes all activities directly supporting Deans and Department Chairs.
5.0 Student Services This category should include admissions and registrar offices and those activities whose primary purpose is to contribute to the student’s emotional and physical well-being and to his or her intellectual, cultural, and social development outside the context of the formal instructional program.
  • Student services administration
  • Social and cultural development
  • Counseling and career guidance
  • Financial aid administration
  • Student admissions
  • Student records
  • Student health services
6.1 General Administration  
  • Executive Management
  • Fiscal Operations
  • General Administration and Logistical Services
  • Administrative Computing Services
6.3 Sponsored Projects Administration  
  • Grants and Contracts Administration
  • Grants and Contracts Accounting
  • Research Compliance Office
  • Check institution’s financial accounting system for other units identified as sponsored projects administration
7.0 Operation and Maintenance of Plant This category should include the operation and maintenance of physical plants for all institutional activities, including auxiliary enterprises and independent operations.
  • Physical plant administration
  • Building maintenance
  • Custodial services
  • Utilities
  • Landscaper and grounds
  • Major repairs and renovations
9.0 Other Institutional Activities  
  • Residence halls
  • Dining halls
  • Hospitals and clinics
  • Student union
  • Intercollegiate athletics
  • Bookstores
  • Faculty housing, student apartments, guest houses
  • Chapels
  • Theaters
  • Public museums
  • Other similar auxiliary enterprises
  • All activities except:
    • Instruction, departmental research, organized research, other sponsored activities
    • F&A cost activities
    • Specialized service facilities
12.0 Service Center An operation that provides a service or product or a group of services or products for a fee to users principally within the institutional community. The services may range from highly specialized to typical or necessary functions. Often they could not be provided as effectively or efficiently if provided by external sources. A service center develops a rate for the service activity based on actual incurred costs and charges users based on actual usage.
  • An operation that provides services or products for a fee to users principally within the institutional community
13.0 Unoccupied Space Space that at the time of the inventory is either vacant (not assigned to any faculty or staff members) or under renovation.
  • Space that at the time of the inventory is either vacant (not assigned to any faculty or staff members) or under renovation.

Space Requests

OSU Space Allocation Request Form

OSU space is allocated according to the strategic academic, research and outreach priorities established by the university, with the goal of  1) advancing University priorities, 2) improving space functionality, flexibility, and utilization, 3) providing space to meet programmatic goals, 4) lowering occupancy rates,  5) reducing the need for physical expansion, and 6) supporting increased collaboration and connectivity across departments. 

Completed Space Allocation request forms are submitted to the Space Management unit of Capital Planning and Development for due diligence review.  A thorough analysis of this request and supplemental material will be reviewed with the requestor to discuss possible solutions.  All space requests and changes to current space must support the OSU Mission, Vision and Strategic Plan. 

Briefly describe the need for space and the reason your department is requesting space, including: • In what way your current space is inadequate for your needs and • Efforts that have been made to use any existing assigned space for the stated purpose
Describe the intended use of the space for each room requested, including: • Location and any special requirements • Room Use Description (e.g. faculty or staff office, teaching lab, research lab, research or teaching support space, departmental classroom, workroom, conference room, storage, reception, etc.) • Number of occupants and occupant type (faculty, staff, T/A, R/A, student workers, etc.)
If this is a request for temporary space, enter the date range that is needed. If this is not a temporary space request, enter the date when the space is needed.
For anticipated minor or major renovations, please provide a brief description of anticipated renovations.
List any space(s) that will be returned to the university inventory with approval of this request, such as rooms or spaces that the Dept. will vacate if this request is approved.
Enter the name, title and dept./college/unit of the unit head who is authorizing this request

Space Survey

OSU Space Survey

Each year, the Space Management Team works with colleges, departments, programs and units across campus to facilitate the OSU Space Survey.  The survey is conducted between February and June, allowing time in the summer for completing any necessary field verifications.

The purpose of the survey is to ensure OSU’s space inventory is accurately represented and managed. Accurate and timely space allocation and usage data supports effective facilities planning and budgeting activities, including indirect cost recoveries, space allocation, and capital planning.  

Working collaboratively with the designated Space Contacts across campus, the Space Management team verifies the following data and updates the OSU Space Management Database accordingly.  Data verified in the Survey includes the following.

  • Square footage of each room/space on campus
  • The Organization (college, department, program, unit) to which a space is assigned
  • Assignment of the correct Functional Space Use Code for each space
  • Assignment of the appropriate Facility (room) Type Code for each space

What's new about the Survey

Over the last year, several major improvements were made for the 2016 Survey to increase the accuracy and relevance of the data and to reduce the time and effort needed to complete the process. 

  • Our Space Team completed onsite space surveys across campus to verify and update floor plan AutoCAD drawings.
  • We greatly simplified and clarified our space use codes by moving to aligning to the Postsecondary Education Facilities Inventory and Classification Manual (FICM) standards, which is a standard practice for initiating, conducting, reporting, and maintaining a postsecondary institutional facilities inventory.
  • Our Space Contact directory has been updated and vetted through Deans, Directors and university leadership to include over 75 contacts.

 

Reports/Resources

(Building) Property Naming Policy

If a unit wants to change the name of a building, that unit must make a request through University Advancement for a building name change. Space Management’s role is to forward the name change request to University Advancement. 

On occasion, Oregon State University seeks to recognize the efforts and contributions of individuals by the naming of buildings, portions of buildings, rooms, fixed furniture, trees, open spaces, fields, streets, and equipment, collectively referred to hereafter as "property." This policy establishes a uniform and consistent procedure to gain university approval and to record these namings for all university property on and off campus. University approval is required before the naming of any university property.

Requests for approval of naming should be transmitted to Facilities Services from the appropriate dean or vice provost. Following receipt of the request, Facilities Services will transmit the request and supporting documents to the Chief Institutional Advancement Officer, who will convene the Property Names Committee to review and forward a recommendation to the President. Final approval of property naming rests with the President.

For more information, visit the University Property Naming Policy Page at http://fa.oregonstate.edu/gen-manual/university-property-naming-policy

Categories of Building Measurement

Move Guide

The OSU Move Guide provides a list of contact and helpful information to help facilitate a successful transition for moving departments. Click on image to download the Move Guide.

Move Guide

Moving Services Info:

For moves involving four (4) or more offices, the following two professional moving companies are on master contracts with OSU:

Lile North American

 

Bertsch Moving and Storage

 

For moves involving LESS than four (4) offices, contact:

Campus Moves at Surplus Property

  • PH:  541-754-0222
  • Web: fa.oregonstate.edu/surplus.campus-moves

 

Department Contacts:

Department

Contact Info

Access, Lock and Key

 

Obtain and return keys, lock rekeying, questions related to security/key access.

Custodial Services

 

OSU Building Services Manager:

Raquel Ndzeidze: 541-737-2157/541-737-7639

GCA Services Group—Custodial Services

Cornerstone Associates

Environmental Health & Safety

 

Notify EH&S prior to:

  • vacating any lab or lab-related spaces or equipment for evaluation and decontamination, as determined in consult with EH&S.
  • conducting remodeling that involves demolition, alterations or refinishing surfaces, as an asbestos or lead evaluation may be needed.

 

  • PH: 541-737-2273
  • Web: oregonstate.edu/ehs

 Facilities Services

Alarms, asbestos testing, building controls, carpentry, customer service, electrical, elevators, energy center, landscape, lock and key, maintenance, painting, plumbing, refrigeration, steam fitters and Stores warehouse.

Mailing Services

 

Notify change in location and arrange for Campus Mail Service.

Surplus Property & Campus Recycling

 

Acquire and dispose of furniture/office supplies, schedule surplus pickups, and small campus moves (LESS than 4 people). Notify recycling if new receptacles are needed or to arrange for additional recycling needs

RP1 Forms (adding/removing/renaming an asset)

Space Management oversees the collection and verification of building, streets, parking lots, fields, infrastructure and improvements other than buildings for submission of Real Property 1 forms to add the asset to university databases.

When Space Management receives a request to create an RP1 submission for a new asset, removal of a demolished or removed property, or a renaming of an asset, the space representative works with University GIS, University Land Use Planning, Financial Services, and Capital Planning and Development's Project and Construction Managers to gather and verify accurate information on the asset.  Upon completion of the RP1 form that contains the verified information, the Space Representative forwards to RP1 form to Business Affairs and Property Management for signatures.  The signed RP1 form is then disseminated to

The Real Property 1 (RP1) form identifies buildings by name and number before they are constructed and as they are acquired by OSU in the Fixed Asset module of BANNER, and the GIS and the Facilities Services AiM databases.  These assets can include buildings, Improvements Other Than Buildings (IOTBs), Streets, Parking Lots, Fields and infrastructure.

RP1s strengthen Capital Planning and Development’s capacity to efficiently capture baseline data in OSU asset databases improving cross-unit space-related solutions and partnerships by enhanced reporting and database management.  This improves reporting that supports Capital Planning and Space Management in scenario planning for the space needs of OSU departments and their sub-unit Organizations.  This aids Capital Planning in its ability to identify underutilized space in properties on and off the main OSU campus increasing its capacity to analyze and respond to a rapidly growing list of space requests.

This serves to increase accountability and transparency to the OSU Board of Trustees, the federal and state government and to the OSU community. 

For more information on the RP1 process, contact SpaceManagement@oregonstate.edu

Request for RP1

This webform is used to initate the Real Property 1 (RP1) creation and approval process.

Enter asset name
Enter location information for the asset
Indicate asset type
Files must be less than 2 MB.
Allowed file types: gif jpg jpeg png pdf doc xls xlsx.

Room and Space Types

Space Allocation Request Form

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