PART 1:  GENERAL

Classroom furniture is an important and often overlooked consideration in the overall accessibility for classrooms. The purpose of these standards is to provide a resource for departments, faculty, and staff who are required to ensure access for students, faculty, and visitors with disabilities to general purpose classrooms at OSU. The following standards were developed using the ADAAG, recommendations in Access for Everyone: A Guide to the Accessibility of Buildings and Sites and through research on current furniture types that both meet the requirements of the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design and work well for users.

  1. REFERENCES
    1. 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design
    2. Access for Everyone: A Guide to the Accessibility of Buildings and Sites
    3. The United States Department of Labor, Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OHSA)
    4. IZZY Overture Chairs
    5. Office Master Nesting Chair
    6. Fagaleo Education Seating
    7. SurfaceWorks Height Adjustable Tables

  2. NUMBER OF ACCESIBLE SEATS
    1. Each classroom shall have at least* the following, in addition to requirements in the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design:
      1. One (1) – Lumbar support chair
      2. One (1) – Bariatric-rated chair
      3. Two (2) – Chairs for interpreters & transcribers
      4. One (1) – Height adjustable table 
      5. Companion chairs/seating shall be provided per Sections 221 and 803 of the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design.
      6. Additional lumbar support chairs, bariatric chairs, and height adjustable tables should be considered in large classrooms/lecture halls. Exact numbers shall be determined with OSU during design.

PART 2: PRODUCTS

  1. LUMBAR SUPPORT CHAIRS
    1. Users with back injuries may have difficulty sitting for long periods of time, especially in hard non-ergonomic chairs. Sitting in non-ergonomic chairs may exacerbate pain and make it difficult for people with disabilities to utilize the classroom space. Lumbar support chairs should have the following specifications as defined by the Office of Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OHSA)
      1. A backrest that conforms to the natural curvature of the spine.
      2. Armrests should be soft, chairs without armrests allow for users of larger size (bariatric) to use the same seating.
      3. A stable base that can support users up to 300 lbs)
    2. Examples of Lumbar Support Chairs (See Diagram 12 56 33A at the end of this section)

  2. BARIATRIC CHAIRS
    1. Users of larger stature need larger seating than is provided in classrooms to be able to participate in classes.  Ergonomic chairs without arms provide the necessary size for this. To be rated a bariatric chair the weight capacity should be at least 500 lbs.

  3. CHAIRS FOR INTERPRETERS/TRANSCRIBERS
    1. Two (2) chairs for interpreters and/or transcribers shall be provided in all classrooms.
    2. The OSU required standard is the Office Master YES Series nesting chair: Model YS71N, with no arms or wheels.
    3. The design for the classrooms should include a provision for secure storage of the interpreter/transcriber chairs close to the front of the classrooms.
    4. Example of Interpreter/Transcriber Chair (See Diagram 12 56 33B at the end of this section)

  4. WHEELCHAIR USER SPACES
    1. If writing surfaces are provided to non-accessible spaces, wheelchair spaces shall be provided with comparable writing surfaces. It is preferable to provide multiple options for type of writing surface and seating location. In areas where space allows, tables meeting the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design are preferable.
    2. In rooms where space does not allow or in rooms where fixed tablet arm chairs are used, tablets without a chair attached shall be provided.
    3. Tablet arm tops must meet reach range requirements and operability requirements in the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design.
    4. When elements such as power, data ports, microphones, etc. are provided to non-accessible spaces, an equivalent element shall be provided to the accessible spaces.
    5. Example of Table Arm (See Diagram 12 56 33C at the end of this section).

  5. CLASSROOM TABLES
    1. Table Clearances
      1. Width: Provide minimum 36 inch width for a single wheelchair user or 66 inch width to accommodate two wheelchair users.
      2. Knee Space Height:  Provide minimum 30” high. (The 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design require at least 27 inches.)
      3. Knee Space Depth: Provide minimum 19” deep knee space clear of any obstructions.
        1. The space under the table top shall be unobstructed (i.e. no crossbar supports)
        2. Fixed tables
          1. Where fixed tables are provided, the bottom of the table top should be minimum 30 inches in height. (The 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design require at least 27 inches.) The table top must be no higher than 34 inches.
    2. Adjustable Tables
      1. Adjustable tables should not have a crossbar underneath, as this prohibits a wheelchair user from pulling all the way under the table. These tables should be at least 66 inches wide to allow for two users and/or companions, and should be height adjustable from at least 25 inches to 40 inches.
      2. Controls: There are four types of controls on adjustable tables: top-crank, side-crank, hydraulic assist and electric.
        1. Electric or hydraulic controlled tables are preferred.
        2. If electric or hydraulic tables are cost prohibitive or power is not available, side-crank tables should be provided. Top-crank tables shall not be used.
        3. On side-crank tables, the crank mechanism should fold under the table top so it can be hidden under the table to reduce possible breakage and prevent the possibility of tripping or snagging clothes.
        4. Cranks should be metal instead of plastic to prevent possible breakage and need for more constant maintenance.
        5. Cranks should not be removable.
        6. Examples of Adjustable Table (See Diagram 12 56 33D at the end of this section)

  6. TABLES FOR LOBBIES AND STUDY AREAS
    1. Where tables are provided in lobbies, study areas, and similar spaces, a minimum of one in five tables shall be accessible meeting the clearance requirements stated in 5 above.  Where fewer than five tables are provided, at least one shall be accessible.
    2. In general, pedestal tables are not considered accessible because of inadequate clear space below the table.

  7. SIGNS
    1. Appropriate signs indicating that accessible spaces and furniture are preferred for persons with disabilities shall be provided by OSU. Signs for the interpreter and transcriber chairs shall also be provided. It is the responsibility of the construction manager to arrange for signs to be provided.
    2. Signs for accessible spaces and furniture shall be a blue background with white text, 6 inches high and 4 inches wide, and include the language, “Preferred Seating for People with Disabilities. Do not remove of relocate. Questions? Call: 541-737-4098 Disability Access Services.” Standard accessibility icons should follow.
    3. The interpreter and transcriber chair signs shall be a blue background with white text, 2.5 inches high by 4 inches wide, and include the language, “Interpreter/Transcriber Chair.”
    4. Examples of Signage (See Diagram 12 56 33E at the end of this section)

 
Diagram 12 56 33A
Examples of Lumbar Support Chairs
 



 


 

Diagram 12 56 33B

Examples of Interpreter/Transcriber Chair


 


 

Diagram 12 56 33C

Example of Table Arm


 

Diagram 12 56 33D

Examplse of Adjustable Table

 


 

Diagram 12 56 33E

Examples of Signage